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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 15
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 15. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1740.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 15. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1740

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 15, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1740.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_014.jpg
Transcript Washington, May 12.—Recognition of the Omsk Government by the Allied Powers may be forthcoming at any time, it was intimated today at the State Department. . . . Added to these developments is news of the steady loss of power by the Bolsheviki. The ring of nations hostile to their aims is still tightening, while from the East come the armies of Admiral Kolchak. The end of spring may see the end of Bolshevism according to the belief in well-informed circles here. . . . The Navy Department has received short reports indicating the early demise of Bolshevism.— (New York American, May 13, 1919.) Washington, D. C, Sunday.—Reports coming to Washington from various official sources forecast the collapse of the Bolshevist state very soon, possibly within the next fortnight. Outwardly the Soviet Government continues to operate. Trotzky talks glibly about raising a red army of enormous proportions, and manifestoes and decrees are issued without interruption. But, according to information that sifts across the frontiers of the Bolshevist dominion, the organization is tottering. . . . Bolshevist Russia, the reports all indicate, is like a leaking ship. At a distance it looks formidable. Actually its radical crew is demoralized. The whole fabric of authority is waterlogged and at any moment it may go down like a plummet.— (New York Herald, June 2, 1919.) Paris, April 30.—Bolshevism is fading out in Eastern Europe. President Wilson's experts on the Slavic, Polish and Magyar situations have sound information to this effect. The British and French Governments have received like news, and the opening of summer . . . finds the Bolshevik movement decidedly on the wane. Except for the points where Bolshevik troops are in contact with invading troops of foreign nations . . . there is little vigor remaining in the Bolshevik movement in Russia.— (Special article by William G. Shepard, Foreign Correspondent of the New York Evening Post, printed on June 3, 1919.) The Cabinet Takes a Hand The highest government officials have uttered the same absurdities. Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy, was quoted in the New York Herald of May 19, 1919, as follows: If Bolshevism continues its murderous acts much longer the reaction will be intensified everywhere. But Bolshevism is on the wane. Russia will adjust herself before long. The fabrications about Russia have not been confined to prophecy. Misrepresentation of present conditions in Russia have even exceeded the misrepresentations of Russia's future. Secretary of Labor Wilson said, according to the Washington Star of May 4, 1919, . . . that Bolshevism is precisely as democratic as was the absolutism of Czar Nicholas, Kaiser Wilhelm and Emperor Carl, no more and no less. Attorney General Palmer, in a letter dated January 27, 1920, and addressed to editors of magazines and newspapers 13