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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 14
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 14. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1739.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 14. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1739

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 14, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1739.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_013.jpg
Transcript A very few of the more careful editorial writers did not accept these " documents'' from the first—the New York Evening Post, the Nation, the New Republic among them. Since then their prestige has rapidly declined even among the less cautious. One of the most pointed attacks of many which have been made by conservative critics appears in E. H. Wilcox's recent book, entitled "Russia's Ruin," published in 1919 by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. Mr. Wilcox, who is an ardent opponent of Soviet theory and practice, was formerly Petrograd correspondent for the Daily Telegraph of London. On page 248 he says: The great effort to prove Lenin's complicity with the governments of the Central Empires was the series of documents collected by the American Committee on Public Information and published by that body as a pamphlet, with the title, "The German Bolshevik Conspiracy." This pamphlet will always remain a monument of that paralysis of the critical faculties which seems inseparable from a state of war. In the introduction the documents are said to show "that the present Bolshevik Government is not a Russian government at all, but a German government, acting solely in the interests of Germany and betraying the Russian people, as it betrays Russia's natural Allies, for the benefit of the Imperial Government alone." Unfortunately, they show nothing of the kind. Indeed, the only thing they show quite plainly is the incapacity of those who collected them for the mission with which they were entrusted. The detailed examination of these documents is impossible here, but one illustration will suffice to characterize them. The pamphlet includes some fifteen or sixteen facsimilies by way of corroboration. One of these facsimilies purports to be a circular sent out on November 28, 1914, by the "General Staff" of the German High Sea Fleet. Now, such a body as a "General Staff" does not exist in the German Navy. What corresponds in the Navy to the General Staff of the Army is the "Admiral Staff." The circular itself consists of eighteen lines. In these eighteen lines are two mistakes in grammar, seven mistakes in spelling and seven mistakes in phrasing. An expert on the German language has given the following opinion: "This circular was most certainly not written by a German. It would appear to be a very poor attempt to copy German official language." That, it is true, is only one of the documents; but its inclusion in the pamphlet undoubtedly shows a failure so gross to apply the most rudimentary tests that in itself it throws grave doubts on the authenticity of the whole collection. n Inspired" Dispatches Other departments of the United States Government have been engaged in the universal intrigue against the Soviet Government. The newspapers have continually printed dispatches from Washington and Paris giving an official interpretation of Russian events. The character and purpose of these inspired stories is obvious from a mere quotation of a few typical examples. 12