Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 12
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 12. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1737.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 12. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1737

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 12, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1737.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_011.jpg
Transcript I Rlt L Russia rests upon the assumption, first, that the Soviet regime is unstable—"tottering" is the most thumb-marked word in this connection; and, second, that it is insane. These are its roots. From them the rest of the myth has grown and blossomed and borne fruit. Nothing but the delusion of "instability" in Russia could have explained and excused the attempt of the Allies to crush by force of arms the political structure set up by 200,000,000 people inhabiting an area of one-fifth of the entire surface of the globe. Nothing but the delusion of "insanity" could have explained and excused the complete and compulsory isolation of a whole nation from intercourse with the rest of the world. Had public men and newspapers not continually prophesied the "early collapse" of the Soviet power, public opinion in the Allied countries would have made an end of the project of armed intervention before it was even put into effect. Had the public mind not been inflamed with the idea that Bolshevism was actually a disease of the mind that spread like smallpox, the cordon sanitaire could not even have been conceived. Instability and insanity have been the roots of the Russian myth. The full bloom may be characterized in a single sentence. Soviet Russia has come to mean to the average man the temporary terrorization of the Russian masses by a small group of crazy cut-throats, murderers and assassins bribed by German gold. Starting with the assumption of insanity and instability this conception seems not only possible but probable. From such assumptions stories of atrocities, terror of every conceivable kind, German bribes, starvation, loot, rapine and unbridled fury, grew up over night and flourished and came to represent Russia in the public mind. It has taken an army of 2,000,000 determined and disciplined men, and two and a half years of increasing civil and political order in Soviet Russia; it has taken the complete collapse of Allied strategy and diplomacy, and it has taken thousands of human lives, and suffering beyond measure, to undermine the Soviet myth. Insanity and instability do not produce order and discipline, military strength, and victory on more than a dozen fronts against the combined force and intrigue of the entire world. For the mass of people in America the myth still exists, but each week's batch of news dispatches makes its life more hazardous. There has been, of course, about as much truth in all this paean of abuse that has come to represent Russia in the public mind as there was in the statements of the bank officials quoted above. Some of the grossest fabrications have already 10