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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 11
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 11. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1736.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 11. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1736

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 11, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1736.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_010.jpg
Transcript BANKERS AS PROPHETS The National City Bank is recognized as one of the leading authorities in the United States on financial and business affairs. In January, 1917, two months before the March Revolution and only nine months before the proletarian Revolution that swept away the entire structure of private property in Russia, the Executive Manager of this bank, Mr. Samuel McRoberts, delivered an address which was published as a pamphlet by the bank and sent to its clients as a guide for business men and investors. The subject of his address, and the title of the pamphlet, was "Russia." Mr. McRoberts described with a considerable wealth of statistical material what he considered the condition of Russia from the point of view of the American investor. Toward the end of his address he gave his opinion on the future of the country. It is recorded on page 15 of the pamphlet: In criticizing and forecasting the political future of Russia great emphasis has been laid upon the spirit of unrest and the agitation of the Nihilist, the Democrat, or the Conservative-Progressive. It has been overlooked that the great mass of the Russian people remain loyal to the hereditary ruler, and the discontent is not with the crowned head, but with what may be assumed to be the miscarriage of his intentions. Furthermore, the Russian people are a peculiarly religious people, with an unparalleled unity in religious belief and practice. These elements in the situation render it impossible for any revolution to make progress unless its aims are conservative and it contains a religious element. . . . It is well understood in Russia that a constitutional government must be evolved out of the situation and cannot be obtained by revolution and no apprehension may be felt for the stability of the personal or property rights of the foreign investor. One of the chief executives of the same National City Bank, after a tour of most of the countries of Europe to observe social, economic and political conditions, and after having been received in this country by press and public as a sort of oracle on affairs abroad, said to the author of these lines in June, 1919, a week or so after he arrived from his tour: The Soviet regime can last but a few months more at the most. The Allies will continue the blockade; it will not be lifted. The United States and the other Allies will never treat in any way with the present government. They will only negotiate with a government of sanity and stability. THE ROOTS OF THE RUSSIAN MYTH The words "sanity and stability" are typical. The myth which the rulers of the Allied countries have built up about