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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 10
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 10. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1735.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 10. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1735

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 10, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1735.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_009.jpg
Transcript an almost incalculable volume of trade in manufactured goods, and raw materials for the reconstruction of their industries. The Russian Revolution has, in fact, disclosed the complete bankruptcy of the conservative press, government officials, leading business men and publicists as sources of reliable information. Almost every prominent man in and out of government circles in the Allied nations has, during the last three years, made public confession of a density of ignorance about Russia that—were the same ignorance displayed on any other subject—would have destroyed his reputation for stability and sound judgment. The same is true of practically every conservative newspaper in Europe and America. The attacks upon the Government of Soviet Russia by responsible officials of the United States Government, not to mention the governments of other Allied nations, have violated all canons of diplomatic and social custom and propriety. The United States has at no time been at war with Russia. President Wilson emphasized this in the famous fourteen points which he laid down as the conditions of a just peace. He went so far, in his address to Congress, Jan. 8, 1918, three months after the Soviet Government came into power, as to demand "the evacuation of all Russian territory and such a settlement of all questions affecting Russia as will secure the best and freest cooperation of the other nations of the world in obtaining for her an unhampered and unembarrassed opportunity for the independent determination of her own political development and national policy and assure her of a sincere welcome into the society of free nations under institutions of her own choosing; and more than a welcome, assistance also of every kind that she may need and may herself desire." In spite of this solemn pronouncement the government of the United States, including the President himself, the press and prominent men and women the country over, have united in a campaign of abuse against Russia, to say nothing of the invasion of Russian territory by the armies of the United States, which would have amounted to a casus belli a hundred times over with any other country. A brief review of the most striking illustrations of this anti-Russian propaganda is necessary for any understanding of American public opinion about Russia. The examples are so vast in number that it is difficult to make a choice. Those that are given are but an insignificant proportion of those that might be given. They are merely typical instances of what has been going on daily in every part of the country for the past three years. 8