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The Chicago martyrs
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The Chicago martyrs - Image 146. 1899. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1703.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1899). The Chicago martyrs - Image 146. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1703

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Chicago martyrs - Image 146, 1899, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1703.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Chicago martyrs
Alternative Title The Chicago martyrs: the famous speeches of the eight anarchists in Judge Gary's court, October 7, 8, 9, 1886, and Reasons for pardoning Fielden, Neebe, and Schwab
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Altgeld, John Peter, 1847-1902
  • Spies, August Vincent Theodore, 1855-1887
Publisher Free Society Publishing Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Francisco, California
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Haymarket Square Riot, Chicago, Ill., 1886
  • Anarchists
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Fielden, Samuel, 1847-
  • Neebe, Oscar W., 1850-
  • Schwab, Michael, 1853-
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 159 pages; [2] leaves of plates; 1 illustration; 1 portrait; 23 cm.
Original Item Location HX846.C4C43 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8319999~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 146
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_21042507_145.jpg
Transcript 138 ALTGELD'S REASONS FOR PARDONING was equally balanced, would you dicide one way or the other in accordance with that opinion or your prejudice? A. If the testimony was equally balanced I should hold my present opinion, sir. Q. Assuming that your present opinion is, that you believe the defendants guilty, would you believe your present opinion would warrant you in convicting them? A. I presume it would. Q. Well, you believe it would; that is your present belief, is it? A. Yes, sir. He was challenged on the ground of prejudice. The court then examined him at length, and finally asked: Q. Do you believe that you can sit here and fairly and impartially make up your mind, from the evidence, whether that evidence proves that they are guilty beyond a reasonable doubt or not? A. I think I could, but I should believe that I was a little handicapped in my judgment, sir. Thereupon the court, in the presence of the jurors not yet examined, remarked: Well, that is a sufficient qualification for a juror in the case; of course, the more a man feels that he.is handicapped the more he will be guarded against it. W. B. Allen, wholesale rubber business, stated among other things: Q. I will ask you whether what you have formed from what you have read and heard is a slight impression, or an opinion, or a conviction. A. It is a decided conviction. Q. You have made up your mind as to whether these men are guilty or innocent? A. Yes, sir. Q. It would be difficult to change that conviction, or impossible, perhaps? A. Yes, sir. Q. It would be impossible to change your conviction? A. It would be hard to change my conviction. He was challenged for cause by defendants. Then he was examined by the court at length and finally brought to the point of saying that he could try the case fairly and impartially, and would do bo. Then the challenge for cause was overruled. H. L. Anderson was examined at length, and stated that he had formed and expressed an opinion, still held it, was prejudiced, but that he could lay aside his prejudices and grant a fair trial upon the evidence. On being further examined, he said that some of the policemen injured were friends of hii and he had talked with them fully. He had formed an unqualified opinion aa to the guilt or innocence of the defendants, which he regarded as deep-seated, a firm conviction that these defendants, or some of them, were guilty. He was challenged on the ground of prejudice, but the challenge was overruled. M. D. Flavin, in the marble business. He had read and talked about the Haymaiket trouble, and had formed and expressed an opinion as to the guilt or innocence of the defendants, which he still held and which was very strong; fce Mi