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The Chicago martyrs
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The Chicago martyrs - Image 125. 1899. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1682.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1899). The Chicago martyrs - Image 125. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1682

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Chicago martyrs - Image 125, 1899, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1682.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Chicago martyrs
Alternative Title The Chicago martyrs: the famous speeches of the eight anarchists in Judge Gary's court, October 7, 8, 9, 1886, and Reasons for pardoning Fielden, Neebe, and Schwab
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Altgeld, John Peter, 1847-1902
  • Spies, August Vincent Theodore, 1855-1887
Publisher Free Society Publishing Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Francisco, California
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Haymarket Square Riot, Chicago, Ill., 1886
  • Anarchists
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Fielden, Samuel, 1847-
  • Neebe, Oscar W., 1850-
  • Schwab, Michael, 1853-
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 159 pages; [2] leaves of plates; 1 illustration; 1 portrait; 23 cm.
Original Item Location HX846.C4C43 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8319999~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 125
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_21042507_124.jpg
Transcript \imi:i ,, ALBERT R. PARSONS. 117 ton" a8n?^inK • C°al Which the miners <lid ™fc get a cent for. It cost me $9 a who aav th TT™ <Hd ^ get a °ent for !t- And yQt there are Pe°Ple here them. 8e Srievances are imaginary, and that there is nothing in m*^11'-11?^ her6 *8 * nice fchil,K to be re^ *" this country, in this age. A Tor1 T ,!,tler^,ewed the oth«r day by the Chicago papers. His name was health n ' a mini8ter of the Russian navy, traveling in America for his „ '* ti™ mini8ter, this master of the czar's council, met the reporters. Am V'\ Ha*e you han&ed your Nihilists?" referring to tbe condemned .arcnists. On being told that all were condemned and in prison, but they ulac* t yet. ged' he exPressed the hope that the execution would take TrIU \ an.efrly da?> and strongly discountenanced any delay in the matter. la.K about foreigners-you fellows that are talking about foreigners; I think That is a pretty good one. You are going to hang these men on this theory, because they are foreigners. Actually it was made a point to the jury-urged upon the jury by the State's attorney—that we were foreigners, and that we were hostile to the great and glorious institutions of our America. "They were not born here;" and they actually tried to make the jury believe that none of us were born here—that all of us were imported ; and it did sway that jury; I did have its effect upon that jury. Now, here comes this fellow from the czar s dominions. He says, * Gentlemen, that has been a good job ; carrv it out; don't give them any show at all." Now, I denounce this thing. But you say we are revolutionists. Well, if we are, who made us such? Are not the labor exploiters, the monopolists, the mine, factory and workshop czars creating a revolution? They are the revolutionists. I am only a " kicker." I object, I say " No! take your yoke off my neck, take it off, I will not have it on there," and they reply, "You stand still, now, and let me put in this coupling pin, and you'll carry that yoke well enough—if you don't I will have you carried off to the police station ; if you make any noise about it, I will have you hung!" Sir, our execution will be a legal notification to the American workingmen to be warned by our fate that they must not expect to have any of their "imaginary" grievances, as it were, remedied or rectified. Now, your honor, I have gone into this matter for the reason that you said there was nothing in extenuation for these utterances and this kind of an organization. 1 believe you used language something like that. I have gone into this matter as extensively as I have for the purpose of showing that, if your honor was laboring under a misapprehension, I wanted to remove that misapprehension ; that has been the object of what I have said or had to say outside of the matter or mere record of the trial. Now, before I conclude on this point of extenuation, I want to read an editorial in the Chicago Daily News of September 25 What is this? Is it October? * * [Note—I was greatly exhausted Irom physical and mental exertions, haviug spoken two hours the day before and over four hours consecutively that day, tie judge denying me a short respite at noon. At many times during the speech the judge had indicated his Impatience by his actions and looks, to the discomfiture of the speaker. When I asked this question I felt my memory fail me.