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The Chicago martyrs
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The Chicago martyrs - Image 121. 1899. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1678.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1899). The Chicago martyrs - Image 121. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1678

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Chicago martyrs - Image 121, 1899, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1678.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Chicago martyrs
Alternative Title The Chicago martyrs: the famous speeches of the eight anarchists in Judge Gary's court, October 7, 8, 9, 1886, and Reasons for pardoning Fielden, Neebe, and Schwab
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Altgeld, John Peter, 1847-1902
  • Spies, August Vincent Theodore, 1855-1887
Publisher Free Society Publishing Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Francisco, California
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Haymarket Square Riot, Chicago, Ill., 1886
  • Anarchists
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Fielden, Samuel, 1847-
  • Neebe, Oscar W., 1850-
  • Schwab, Michael, 1853-
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 159 pages; [2] leaves of plates; 1 illustration; 1 portrait; 23 cm.
Original Item Location HX846.C4C43 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8319999~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 121
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_21042507_120.jpg
Transcript ADDRESS OF ALBERT R. PARSONS. 113 ! Hnn/n3^106 ugaln8t Anarchy> Communism, and Socialism. You see, Mr. ■■ inneii thought if he could only get that man-that kind of a fellow-K>n the ,;' °" dn tltbea fin^ thing? He doesn't want that kind of a man asked A fellow that was against all this sort of stuff and this kind of thath 11 TW Hlat that kind 0f a man would be solid for hanging a man such ideas. I suppose that was his idea; I don't know what else he 7 ,e ^jected for. Mr. Grinnell said in that connection: "This is a of murder. This question of Anarchy is here too much." You remember this, gentlemen. " We are here to try these men for murder, and not oecause they are Anarchists." This was the second day of the trial, mind you. j hat was Mr. Grinnell; but he was careful to ask every one of the jurymen n they had any sympathy, to ask them if they were in favor of the labor movement; if they were members of a labor union; if they were members of a trades union—he was very particular to find that out—and in arguing the before the jury he and his assistants finally declared that Anarchy was on trial, and that was the thing we must be convicted of. H. E. Graves was a railroad superintendent. 'Are you opposed to labor unions or prejudiced against members of labor organizations?" • "I am; I am opposed to labor organizations of any and all descriptions." Judge Gary inquired of him as follows: * H« 'You believe in individualism—that is, every one, whether a capitalist or a laborer, acting for himself, do you—you are opposed to combination?" J J A. "Yes, sir." Attorney Foster—" Do you believe in railroad pools? " A. " Yes, sir." He was laughed out of the court room. Now, Judge Gary, in his questions to this man, teaches us individualism. Now, that is Anarchy, pure and simple. The Court—Do you take that from any short-hand report? Mr. Parsons—Yes, sir. Mr. Foster—That is true, so far as the answer of the witness is concerned. The Court—It don't sound like anything I would say. Mr. Parsons—Do you believe in individualism, every one, whether capitalist or laborer, acting for himself, do you? Your honor, I took that down at the time you said it. I did not take it from the short-hand reports. The Court—I don't care. Go on. Mr. Foster—What I have reference to is what the juror answered. The Court—My own language is cited there. I don't remember it now, but it is of no consequence. Go on. Mr. Parsons—If every one acted for himself, as the judge says, that would be liberty, and liberty is the end of authority, of government and of statute laws. July 13.—Juryman Reed, a State street music dealer. Attorney Ingbam says: "If the prisoners are guilty you want them convicted; and if they are innocent you want them acquitted, do you not?" Then, " can't you listen to 1