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The Chicago martyrs
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The Chicago martyrs - Image 84. 1899. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1641.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1899). The Chicago martyrs - Image 84. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1641

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Chicago martyrs - Image 84, 1899, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1641.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Chicago martyrs
Alternative Title The Chicago martyrs: the famous speeches of the eight anarchists in Judge Gary's court, October 7, 8, 9, 1886, and Reasons for pardoning Fielden, Neebe, and Schwab
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Altgeld, John Peter, 1847-1902
  • Spies, August Vincent Theodore, 1855-1887
Publisher Free Society Publishing Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Francisco, California
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Haymarket Square Riot, Chicago, Ill., 1886
  • Anarchists
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Fielden, Samuel, 1847-
  • Neebe, Oscar W., 1850-
  • Schwab, Michael, 1853-
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 159 pages; [2] leaves of plates; 1 illustration; 1 portrait; 23 cm.
Original Item Location HX846.C4C43 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8319999~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 84
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_21042507_083.jpg
Transcript 76 ADDRESS OF ALBERT R. PARSONS. I would not in cooler moments? Are not such outrageous things calculated to arouse the bitterest denunciations? \ Your honor, I want to call your attention to some of the reasons which I propose here today to offer in justification of the words and utterances, and the acts, whatever they may have been, of myself, or my colleagues, on the question of force, on the question of arms, and on the question of dynamite. Now, going back to 1877, what do we find? The railroad strikes occurred. During the conflict of that year the following utterances were made by heavy employers and manufacturers and monopolists in this country. I will give you a few samples. This, mark you, is published in the Alarm of November 8, 1884, but the same extracts have been kept standing in the labor papers, published by the Knights of Labor, the Trades Unions, and the Socialists of the United States, there being somewhere over three hundred of these papers Now listen : " Give them (the strikers) a rifle diet for a few days, and see how they like that kind of bread," said Tom Scott, president of the Pennsylvania Central Railway, addressing Gov. Hartranft of Pennsylvania, and calling upon him to send his army of militiamen to Pittsburg, to put down his railroad strikers, who were asking for a little more pay, and some of them asking for pay enough to get their hungry children bread. His answer is, " Give themla rifle diet for a few days and see how they like that kind of bread " Mark you, this was in 1877. " If the workingmen had no vote they might be more amenable to the teachings of the times," says the Indianapolis News "There is too much freedom in this country instead of too little " says the Indianapolis Journals In 1878, the New York Tribune, in an editorial upon strikes, used these words: " These brutal strikers pr creatures can understand no other meaning than that of force, and ought to have enough of it to be re membered among them for many generations." '< Hand grenades should be thrown among these Union sailors who are striving to obtain higher wages and less hours. By such treatment they would be taught a valuable lesson and other strikers could take warning from their fate," said the Chicago Tim " It is very well to relieve real distress wherever it exists, whether in the citv or in the country, but the best meal that can be given a ragged tramn is ] leaden one, and it should be supplied in sufficient quantities to satisfv most voracious appetite," New York Herald, 1878. "The American laborer must make up his mind to be not bo much better than the European laborer He must be contented to work for less wages and must be satisfied with tlmr station in life to which it has pleased God to call him " The Ne Y k World uttered these sentiments in 1878. I could go through the wholLamnt of the monopolistic press of America and show similar expressions of senti ment These sentiments were used againBt strikers, against men who were Bimply eeeking to improve their condition. They only asked for less hours o^ labor and for increased pay These are the bloody, bitter words of these papers ^ow, what follows? It is the experience nowadavs and has Wn since that time, when workingmen strike, to call out the militia That h been the practice since these utterances and declarations in 1878 growing of the great railroad strike. It has become the custom in America to call ou he militia if there is a strike, or even if there is one contemplated. Why look at the packing houses in the city of Chicago. Only yesterday the packing