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The Chicago martyrs
Image 43
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The Chicago martyrs - Image 43. 1899. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1600.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1899). The Chicago martyrs - Image 43. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1600

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Chicago martyrs - Image 43, 1899, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1600.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Chicago martyrs
Alternative Title The Chicago martyrs: the famous speeches of the eight anarchists in Judge Gary's court, October 7, 8, 9, 1886, and Reasons for pardoning Fielden, Neebe, and Schwab
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Altgeld, John Peter, 1847-1902
  • Spies, August Vincent Theodore, 1855-1887
Publisher Free Society Publishing Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Francisco, California
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Haymarket Square Riot, Chicago, Ill., 1886
  • Anarchists
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Fielden, Samuel, 1847-
  • Neebe, Oscar W., 1850-
  • Schwab, Michael, 1853-
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 159 pages; [2] leaves of plates; 1 illustration; 1 portrait; 23 cm.
Original Item Location HX846.C4C43 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8319999~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 43
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_21042507_042.jpg
Transcript / AtUli-cK!** of Sanmel ITielden. and tho' ye caught your noble prey within your hangman's sordid thrall; And tho' your captive was lead forth beneath your city's rampart wall; And tho' the grass lies o'er her green where at the morning's early red The peasant girl brings funeral wreaths—I tell you still—she is not dead! And tho' from off the lofty brow ye cut the ringlets flowing long, And tho' ye've mated her amid the thieves' and murderers' hideous throng, And tho' ye gave her felon fare—bade felon garb her livery be, And tho' ye set the oakum task—I tell you all-she still is free! And tho' compelled to banishment, ye hunt her down thro' endless lands; And tho' she seeks a foreign hearth, and silent 'mid its ashes stands; And tbo' she bathes her wounded feet where foreign streams seek foreign seas; Yet—yet—she never more will hang her harp on Babel's willow trees! Ah, no! she strikes it very strong, and bids their loud deliance swell, And as she marked your scaffold erst, she mocks your banishment as well. She sings a song that starts you up astounded from your slumbrous seats, Until your heart—your ciaven heart—your traitor heart—with terror beats! No song of plaint, no song of sighs for those who perished unsubdued. Nor yet a song of Irony at wrongs fantastic Interlude— The beggar's opera that ye try to drag out thro' its lingering scenes. Tho' moth-eaten the purple be that decks your tinsel kings and queens. Oh, no! the song those waters hear is not of sorrow, nor dismay— 'Tis triumph song—victorious song—the paeans of the future's day— The future—distant now no more—her prophet voice is sounding free. As well as once your Godhead spake: I was, I am, and I will be! Will be—and lead the nation on the last of all your hosts to meet, And on your necks, your heads, your crowns, I'll plant my strong, resistless feet! Avenger, Liberator, Judge—red battles on my pathway hurled, I stretch forth my almighty arm, till it revivilies the world. You see me only in your cells; ye see me only in the grave; Ye see me only wandering lone, beside the exile's sullen wave— Ye fools! Do I not live where ye have tried to pierce In vain? Rests not a nook for me to dwell in every heart and every brain? In every brow that boldly thinks, erect with manhood's honest pride- Does not each bosom shelter me that beats with honor's generous tide? Not every workshop, brooding woe? not every hut that harbors grief? Ha! Am I not the Breath of Life, that pants and struggles for relief? 'Tis therefore I will be—and lead the people yet your hosts to meet, And on your necks, your heads, your crowns, will plant my strong, resistless feet! It is no boast—It is no threat—thus history's Iron law decrees— The day grows hot, oh, Babylon! 'Tis cool beneath thy willow trees! That is a piece of poetry written by Freiligrath, called " Revolution." Freiligrath is a German writer, and every intelligent German in the civilized world has that piece of poetry upon his book-shelves. Revolution—it is a crime in what is sometimes called the foremost civilized country in the world, to be a Revolutionist, and yet all those who can read the works of Freiligrath have read that poem with rapture. It makes a