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The Chicago martyrs
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The Chicago martyrs - Image 7. 1899. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1564.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1899). The Chicago martyrs - Image 7. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1564

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Chicago martyrs - Image 7, 1899, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1725/show/1564.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Chicago martyrs
Alternative Title The Chicago martyrs: the famous speeches of the eight anarchists in Judge Gary's court, October 7, 8, 9, 1886, and Reasons for pardoning Fielden, Neebe, and Schwab
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Altgeld, John Peter, 1847-1902
  • Spies, August Vincent Theodore, 1855-1887
Publisher Free Society Publishing Co.
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Francisco, California
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Haymarket Square Riot, Chicago, Ill., 1886
  • Anarchists
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Fielden, Samuel, 1847-
  • Neebe, Oscar W., 1850-
  • Schwab, Michael, 1853-
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 159 pages; [2] leaves of plates; 1 illustration; 1 portrait; 23 cm.
Original Item Location HX846.C4C43 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8319999~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_21042507_006.jpg
Transcript INTRODUCTION. I )( ;o ie ill at tot make their escape; it was a distressing thing that Parsons, who was in a place of security, should have given himself up to certain death ; it was unfortunate that Spies, Fischer, Parsons, Engel and Lingg did not appeal to the governor for a commutation of sentence; it was terrible that it all should happen as it did, and so on. But this is not the way in which radicals and revolutionists should regard the matter. It was not the view taken by the martyrs themselves. They loved the cause with a love that knew no weakness or compromise. Their very souls were bound up in their chosen work. They gloried in it, and in the possibilities, favorable or otherwise, which it might entail upon them. They loved life as well as any vigorous, strong full-lifed men could, but they felt that a sacrifice was necessary and they were ready to make it. Especially was this feeling paramount as the close of their long suffering drew near. Fischer felt it in every fiber of his being when he said at the last moment: 11 This is the happiest moment of my life ! " Spies and Parsons were both assured of clemency if they would but ask for it. Parsons, from the moment of surrendering himself, never expected anything but death. Lingg was proud that he was exalted as one among the elect. He feared not death; he only feared a cell in a lunatic asylum with which he had been threatened. If Lingg took his own life (which I doubt) it was solely to escape this horror which alone he dreaded. Even Neebe begged that he might be given the death sentence. One and all felt the necessity of the great sacrifice, that the movement might be accelerated and its influence extended to the furthermost regions of the earth. Viewed in this light, the whole tragedy, from the hurling of the bomb by unknown parties to the final great climax which swept from our sight our loved comrades, was not a calamity but an event which was a great benefit to humanity. It marked an epoch in the progress of the race upward from slavery and darkness toward freedom and light. The followers of liberty's cause have been increased a hundredfold since the great tragedy. The whole world has heard of the cause for which men were willing to die; whereas before, only one or two in ten thousand had ever heard of the principles of perfect freedom and justice to working people. The people will yet build monuments to their memory.' They were right when they said a few days before their death: " Let no attempt be made to avert the final tragedy of the Eleventh of November; make no effort to avenge our deaths." Inspired as they were by feelings of devotion, they knew that a silent acquiescence in their legal murder would in time to come be far more potent for good than any reprisal could possibly be. Should we not rather rejoice than grieve that our cause has had such martyrs? Sacrifices strengthen a movement, and " the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church." We may be glad that our cause has been strengthened and spread broadcast over the land by the martyrdom of the Chicago Anarchists. Wm. Holmes. Denver, Colo.