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The state, its historic role, 5th edition
Image 8
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Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921. The state, its historic role, 5th edition - Image 8. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 4, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1512/show/1475.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921. (1920). The state, its historic role, 5th edition - Image 8. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1512/show/1475

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921, The state, its historic role, 5th edition - Image 8, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 4, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1512/show/1475.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The state, its historic role, 5th edition
Series Title Freedom pamphlet
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921
Publisher Freedom Press
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • State, The
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English; French
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 42 pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location JC268.K72
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304434~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Note Translation of L'état, son role historique.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_5161590_007.jpg
Transcript 8 The State : Its Historic Title. In the first centuries of our era, immense migrations took place among the tribes and confederations of tribes that inhabited Central and Northern Asia. A stream of peoples, driven by more or less civilised tribes, came down from the table-lands of Asia—probably driven away by the rapid* drying-up of those plateaux—inundated Europe, impelling one another onward, mingling with one another in their overflow towards the West. During these migrations, when so many tribes of diverse origin were intermixed, the primitive tribe which still existed among them and the primitive inhabitants of Europe necessarily became disaggregated. The tribe was based on its common origin, on the worship of common ancestors; but what common origin could be invoked by the agglomerations that emerged from the hurly-burly of migrations, collisions, wars between tribes, during which we see the paternal family spring up here and there—the kernel formed by some men appropriating women they had conquered or kidnapped from neighbouring tribes ? Ancient ties were rent asunder, and under pain of a general breakup (that took place, in fact, for many a tribe, which then disappeared from history) it was essential that new ties should spring up. And they sprung up. They were found in the communal possession of land —of a territory, on which such an agglomeration ended by settling down. The possession in common of a certain territory, of certain valleys, plains or mountains, became the basis of a new agreement. Ancient gods had lost all meaning; and the local gods of a valley, river or forest, gave the religious consecration to the new agglomeration, substituting themselves for the gods of the primitive tribe. Later on, Christianity, always ready to accommodate itself to pagan survivals, made local saints of them. Henceforth, the village community, composed partly or entirely of separate families—all united, nevertheless, by the possession in common of the land—became the necessary bond of union for centuries to come. On the immense stretches of land in Eastern Europe, Asia and Africa, it still exists to-day. The barbarians who destroyed the Roman empire—Scandinavians, Germans, Celts, Slavs, etc.—lived under this kind of organization. And, in studying the ancient barbarian codes, as well as the laws and customs of the confederations of village communes among the Kabyles, Mongols, Hindoos, Africans, etc., which still exist, it become possible to reconstitutes in its entirety that form of society, which was the starting point of our present civilization, Let us therefore, cast a glance on that institution.