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Russia's gift to the world
Image 49
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 49. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1424.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 49. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1424

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 49, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1424.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 49
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_048.jpg
Transcript Russia's Gift to the World 47 \ h * ** Do not grant her selfish peace, Do not send her blind arrogance ; The spirit of death, the spirit of doubt, Let them be extinguished in the spiritual life." As a theory based on actual facts, this doctrine of continuity between Greece and Russia would not be accepted by historians. But it is a doctrine which has been of the greatest importance, like other unverified doctrines or theories, in its influence, through the minds of those who accepted it, upon the course of modern history. And the regenerative mission of Russia may well pass from a dream into a fact when the self-regeneration which we now see in progress has been really effected. The ideals of mankind as they were defined by the French Revolution are liberty, equality, and fraternity. It has been said, and said with great truth, that of the three, liberty has been fought for and won in England, but equality and fraternity are much more fully attained in Russia. They have not got liberty, at least in the political sense of the word, because they have not greatly desired it. Is not the converse true of ourselves, that we have not got equality and fraternity, because we have not greatly desired them ? But the lack of discipline which is noted by observers of Russian life really comes of a sort of excess of individual liberty in matters apart from politics. The general Russian attitude with regard to government is very much like that of Dr. Johnson in our own country. " I would not give hatf-a- guinea to live under one form of government rather than another " ; " All governments are alike"; " Political liberty is good only so far as it produces private liberty." These are bold paradoxes ; but like all Johnson's sweeping sayings, they have a basis of strong common sense. And in these sayings there is at least so much truth as this, that the failure of the Russian political reformers was because s