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Russia's gift to the world
Image 48
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 48. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1423.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 48. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1423

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 48, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1423.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 48
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_047.jpg
Transcript 46 Russia's Gift to the World of Dickens, but where the Russian suffered and despaired the Englishman suffered and acted. The reforms wrought, for instance, in our police courts, in our boarding schools, and in our educational system are directly due in a very large measure to the effect produced by Oliver Twist and Nicholas Nickleby and Hard Times. The craze for foreign things which went so far to spoil the early efforts of the Russian people towards growth and self-realisation began to give place, about the middle of last century, to the notion of a regenerative mission. They were seized by the idea that they were an elect nation which should reconcile the failure of other nations and be a constructive power for the whole world. This was the idea which lay at the base of the Slavophil movement, and gave it the moral force which lay behind it as a merely racial or political movement. It was in pointed opposition to the Western notion, not yet extinct, that Russia was a blank sheet. After the fall of Constantinople in 1453, Russia regarded herself as the inheritor of the Roman Empire. Moscow was the " third Rome." Homy- akov, some sixty or seventy years ago, expanded this doctrine into one which has been since then one of the great motives or generative ideas in the world, that of a historical continuity by which the world-mission of Greece had passed to Russia through Byzantium. He emphasised the simplicity and love of peace which characterised Russian life. He claimed that " if there be a brotherhood of nations, moral supremacy does not belong to Germany, with her military and aristocratic ideals, but to the plebeian and agricultural Slavs." In the Russian character he discerned what he found to be a " fountain of living water " only held back by the national apathy and timidity. This feeling is expressed in his celebrated prayer for Russia, written in the album of the musician Glinka:— i \