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Russia's gift to the world
Image 44
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 44. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 25, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1419.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 44. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1419

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 44, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 25, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1419.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 44
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_043.jpg
Transcript 42 Russia's Gift to the World still remember that in those very times England stood high in the world, not only through the fame of her writers and thinkers and artists and men of science, but as a mother of freedom. She was full of faults, and was doing great and good work in spite of them. Nevertheless these facts show one thing clearly, and suggest another. What they show is, that the gift of Russia to the world is great. In 1836 a Russian author said despairingly that " we have given nothing to the world; we must begin over again." They began over again. They have done what deserves admiration and gratitude, what helps other nations and gives them hope. What they suggest, and what is borne out the more one takes pains to know more of them, is an affinity, not less marked because of certain strong contrasts, between the Russian nation and our own. The idea of nationality is one of the most potent in modern life. When we ask, What is a nation ? the answer is that it is not a matter of blood, for nearly all nations consist of mixed races, nor is it a matter of language, which is often an accident. In most nations different languages are spoken, and there are separate nations, like the United States and ourselves, which speak the same language. Nationality lies in the consciousness of kinship and of mutual understanding, in the same habits of thought and life, in common memories of the past, and in common hopes for the future. Each nation has in this sense an individuality ; each nation is a person, a member of the family of nations. It is of the essence of the family that each member of it is different from the others. Each has a different sphere of work and of duty, and each can help or, if unhappily it should be so, each can hinder the rest. Through ignorance and through prejudice, this kinship has not been properly realised. The failure