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Russia's gift to the world
Image 42
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 42. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 25, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1417.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 42. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1417

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 42, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 25, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1417.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 42
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_041.jpg
Transcript 40 Russia's Gift to the World tendency towards mysticism, is characteristically Russian. In him, as in other writers, may be noted a tendency of the Russian nature to make philosophic thought concrete, to give it an immediate social or religious bearing, and to apply it directly to the problems of life. Thus Mikhailovsky is notable for his work in opposing and confuting that doctrine of the " struggle for existence," as applied to the moral world, on which Treitschke built his famous theories. The teaching of these thinkers insists before all things on duty ; it defines progress as the increase of human happiness, and patriotism as the desire for this progress ; and it affirms that the happiness of a people cannot be founded on the unhappiness of any other people. The study of economics and sociology is one into which the educated class in Russia has, for three- quarters of a century or more, thrown itself with the utmost eagerness. It has been urged to this both by social environment and by natural bent. For the Russian mind is singularly quick and receptive, and its courage in following out arguments to their logical conclusion is even greater than that of the French, and perhaps only equalled by that of the ancient Greeks ; and the conditions of a country which has changed so swiftly, and in which economic and social questions have presented themselves on so large a scale, have led to a wide study of social and economic problems. Russians have devoured and assimilated all the theories and systems of the West, independent of the country of their origin—those of Comte, Herbert Spencer, or Marx ; and they have added to them many of their own. They have also made, and are making, large contributions to the collection and systematisation of facts. Plechanov has a European reputation as a writer on sociology. Chuprov, Struve, Tugan-Baranovsky are among the names familiar to economic students. There is a whole fe^