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Russia's gift to the world
Image 37
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 37. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 24, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1412.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 37. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1412

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 37, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 24, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1412.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 37
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_036.jpg
Transcript I Russia's Gift to the World 3S tion in the higher animals, and to become one of the founders of the modern doctrine of immunity. For the last thirty years, at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, to which he transferred his work from Odessa, he has devoted his whole attention to research into the mechanisms of defence employed by the higher organisms against infection, and his work on this subject has formed one of the chief sources of inspiration to bacteriologists and physicians in all countries. The zoologist Danilevsky must be regarded as a pioneer in our knowledge of the protozoal parasites of the blood, which have acquired so much importance since they have been shown to be the cause of such diseases as malaria, sleeping sickness, and syphilis. Mention may also be made of the excellent work of Bekhterev, Dogiel, Kulchitsky, Maximov, and others on the microscopic structure of the body. In physiology Russia may boast of possessing the greatest of living physiologists, Pavlov, who was one of the earliest to receive the Nobel Prize. By the application of Lister's discoveries to physiological technique, he was enabled to throw so much light on the processes of digestion in the higher animals that there is very little of our present knowledge of the subject which we do not owe to him or to his pupils. During the last ten years he has transferred his attentions to the investigations of the functions of the brain. Here again the employment of a new and original method promises to initiate a new era in the study of mental processes. In botany Russia has produced a series of brilliant workers, among whom Russov in plant-anatomy, Famintsyn, Navashin, and Belayev in embryology and cytology, should be specially mentioned. It is, however, the plant physiologists, Timiryazev and Palladin, whose work has probably had the widest influence on their scientific contemporaries; while •i