Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Russia's gift to the world
Image 36
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 36. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 25, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1411.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 36. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1411

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 36, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 25, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1411.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 36
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_035.jpg
Transcript 34 Russia's Gift to the World or the theory of earthquakes. To no one does this new science owe more than to Prince Golitsyn, whose researches have extended over many years. By the seismograph of his invention the study of the tremors in the earth can be pursued with a certainty and precision far in advance of anything possible with the older forms of instrument. Unrivalled opportunities for the study of the phenomena of earthquakes are afforded by the provision of a score of earthquake stations in different parts of the Russian Empire. Among chemists far and away the greatest name of modern times is that of Mendeleyev. By the publication in 1869 of his well-known periodic law of the elements he changed the whole current of thought in the chemical world. In this classical paper not only did he point out that the then known elements were related one to another, but he was able by the discovery of gaps in his scheme to predict the existence and the properties of unknown elements —predictions which have been crowned with success by later discoveries. The name of Mendeleyev will be for ever enrolled with those of Boyle, Lavoisier, and Dalton as one of the founders of chemistry. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE In the Biological Sciences the Russian savants have achieved a leading position in many branches. Among zoologists Kovalevsky must be ranked with our Francis Balfour as one of the founders of the new science of embryology. His work, with that of Mechnikoy, Salensky, Korotnev, and others, finds its place in every zoological text-book. The work of Mechnikov has attained a reputation which extends far outside the immediate circle of zoologists, and has become familiar in some of its aspects to every educated person. His study of the mechanisms of self-protection in the lower animals led him to grasp the essential nature of the process of inflamma-