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Russia's gift to the world
Image 31
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 31. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 25, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1406.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 31. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1406

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 31, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 25, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1406.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 31
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_030.jpg
Transcript s Russia's Gift to the World 29 The gift of Russia to the world in the sphere of science has developed during the last fifty years. Although the Imperial Academy of Science in Petrograd was founded as far back as 1725, Russian work in science hardly made itself felt before the middle of the 19th century. From this time, however, Russian scientific men have more than played their part in the peaceful competition among nations for the advancement of knowledge. Nor have they confined themselves to what we may call the spade work of science—the careful investigation of phenomena and the amassing of new facts. From the commencement of their activity they have produced men who could act as pioneers in the opening up of new lines of thought, and could show the way of attack into new realms of the unknown. One cannot help being struck with a marked similarity between the history of science in Russia and that in our own country. Whereas in central Europe scientific advance has been largely effected by the organised activity of numerous bodies of workers carrying out with docility the instructions of their learned chiefs, our glory in England is the possession of a constant succession of great men, working alone for the most part, but each by his originality diverting and directing the streams of thought and work not merely of such pupils as he might attract to himself, but of the whole world of science. So it is, too, in Russia, where among others of only less distinction than theirs, three men, Mendeleyev, Mechnikov, and Pavlov, have won world-wide fame, and are in the front rank of modern achievement. It may be that the intellectual barrier between Russia and Western Europe, raised by geographical remoteness and differences of language, confines our vision to the giants of the intellectual forest. But the broad fact is clear that Russia at the present time, as England in the past, while she possesses organised schools of science,