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Russia's gift to the world
Image 29
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 29. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 5, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1404.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 29. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1404

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 29, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 5, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1404.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 29
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_028.jpg
Transcript Russia's Gift to the World 27 in the year, or such and such a play by a certain date. Work is put into preparation ; when he is satisfied with it it is given to the public ; if he is not satisfied the public never sees it at all. Though there is no particular virtue in taking a long time over anything if you can get the same result in a short time, it is a great virtue, and is the unique distinction of this theatre, that the artistic achievement is put first, and, until that has been accomplished, other considerations nowhere. Chekhov's later and maturer dramatic work, The Three Sisters, Uncle Vanya, and The Cherry Orchard, has all been written for and produced at this theatre. Both the plays and their stage-interpretation are typically Russian, but they supply a model for all theatrical work. When you watch a performance there you hardly ask whether such and such an actor is doing the thing well or not. You accept without question that this is what the man or woman was like, that this is how they lived and breathed, quite unconsciously. Almost as remarkable as the company is the audience. Their manners are perfect; they seldom applaud, and if anyone attempted to interrupt the play by doing so he would probably be requested to leave. They seem never to arrive late, and if they do they have to stop outside. Nor is there any of that air of the theatre being a place where disreputable people on one side of the curtain are paid to tickle the senses of idle merry-makers on the other. To the Russian public the theatre takes its place quite simply and sensibly among all the other arts. " For seven years," one is told, " the Arts Theatre did not pay its way, and those who cared gave money freely that it might continue its work without lowering its ideals. Now it is always full, and the people concerned make a respectable living out of it. Beyond that no one seems to associate its success with money-making at all."