Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Russia's gift to the world
Image 28
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 28. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1403.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 28. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1403

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 28, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1403.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_027.jpg
Transcript 26 Russia's Gift to the World though there may be noted in many of them the tendency to joylessness and to representation of the greyer aspects of life which is so marked in our own modern dramatists, their quality is often high. The plays of Chekhov, produced in the Arts Theatre at Moscow, mark a new stage in the development of the drama through their subtlety, delicacy, and truth to life. Wonderful work has been done at that theatre in all branches of the dramatic art during the last fifteen years. A very brief account of it will be the best way of showing what Russia has been doing for the world in this complex and difficult art, so often turned to base uses, and so great in its influence, whether for good or evil. This enterprise has brought about a revolution in the methods of acting and staging, and what is even more important, it seems to have brought about a revolution in the attitude of the public towards the theatre. It was started by two men, Stanislavsky and Danchenko. Their first achievement was the " discovery " of Chekhov. His play, The Seagull, had been coldly received at Petrograd. Stanislavsky, bringing his sympathetic understanding to bear upon this essentially new thing in drama, re-staged it in Moscow. The combination of his art and Chekhov's, the interpretation and creation so brilliantly blended, seem to have achieved at a stroke that perfection which is still the distinguishing mark of the Arts Theatre's work. Other theatres have their own virtues, courage, invention, strength, resource. But as the acted drama has to work in that most fallible and unaccountable medium, the human actor, the margin of error and failure, even in the best performances, must be enormous. In the Moscow Arts Theatre this difficulty seems to be conquered. To Stanislavsky acting is a serious art. He works out its principles; he instructs his company and his pupils, not in its tricks, but in its ethics. He does not try to produce so many plays