Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Russia's gift to the world
Image 26
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 26. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 27, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1401.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 26. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1401

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 26, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 27, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1401.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 26
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_025.jpg
Transcript V 24 Russia's Gift to the World human sense of the word. For beauty and imagination and sense of life, Russian toys are unequalled in Europe ; and the same may be said of many of the Russian picture-books. Nor is peasant art in Russia less remarkable when applied to other substances, such as ornamented leather, enamelled bricks and tiles, and earthenware. In these, as in their wood carving and in their fabrics, the Russians delight in bright strong colour. The native unsophisticated colour-sense is stronger in Russia than in any other European countries. In their use of reds, and also of blues and greens, they are masterly. In any general revivification of popular art, we must look to Russia for strong impulse and for vital assistance. The convergence of the separate arts into a single organic whole was very remarkably shown in the productions of the Russian Opera in London in the years 1913-14. Hardly less delightful in these than the music and singing, and the superb acting, were the architectural backgrounds, the massing and disposition of the performers and the harmonious glowing brilliance of the costumes. Throughout the whole, and giving it cumulative effect, was just this diffused sense of beauty, and instinctive skill in applying it harmoniously. Not only on the musical side, but in its whole appeal through the senses to the intellect and imagination, it was a great achievement and an equally great stimulus. For the first time in its history, this complex form of art was seen, under the Russian genius, ceasing to be artificial and becoming real. It was no longer a pretence art existing for the sake of displaying the cleverness of the performers, but a true art for the sake of which the performers existed, and in which they were doing their natural work. The same is true of the art of choral dancing. Ballet, as understood and practised in Europe, had been little more than a soulless or corrupt display. In Russian hands it II