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Russia's gift to the world
Image 22
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 22. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 24, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1397.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 22. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1397

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 22, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 24, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1397.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 22
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_021.jpg
Transcript 20 Russia's Gift to the World and exuberant vitality. In his Pskovityanka, known in England under the name of Ivan the Terrible, and his Golden Cock, based on a prose tale of Pushkin's, he gave new life to the national art over a wide range of pathos and humour, profound tragedy and brilliant fancy. In all these three musicians what is remarkable is their intense nationality, their wide humanity, and their clear, direct vision. Through their work Russian music has definitely taken a place in the great art of the world. These names, and those of other distinguished contemporaries, represent, so far, the golden age of Russian music. But that age is being continued in the generation of living musicians, among whom may be mentioned the names of Rakhmaninov, Glazunov, Stravinsky, and Skryabin. They are continuing to produce music of a type less intimately national, but of great beauty and value. As in literature, however, the age of the giants has been succeeded for a time by a period of temporary reaction, and a certain sense of fatigue. The multiplication through Russia of schools of music and of orchestras has, like the diffusion of education, its own dangers. But in both arts there is the consciousness of great things actually achieved; there is wide study and appreciation of the masters ; and there is the full realisation of both literature and music as functions of national life, art by the people and for the people. These facts give much promise and high hopes for the future. No modern music is so powerful as the Russian in its appeal to elementary human instincts, so large and direct, so popular in the best sense of that word. Knowledge of it is now steadily increasing in the west. Selected compositions and songs by Russian composers are widely accessible, and they are helping in England very greatly towards the spread of really good and vital music. r m