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Russia's gift to the world
Image 21
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 21. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1396.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 21. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1396

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 21, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1396.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 21
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_020.jpg
Transcript Russia's Gift to the World 19 word." Glinka and Dargomyzhsky gave between them the lyrical idealism and the dramatic truth which are the scope and aim of music. In the next generation their work bore fruit in the group of great Russian composers who are now recognised as amongst the most important in the history of the modern art. They made Russian music at once national and universal. It is only in recent years that their achievement has been fully realised. The two Russian musicians whose work is even now best known in England, Rubinstein and Chaikovsky (his name is generally spelled Tschaikowsky on our musical programmes and in Western editions of his compositions) are the least distinctively Russian. Rubinstein won his fame throughout Europe less as a musician than as a brilliant pianist. Chaikovsky's emotional and subjective art is essentially Western, or rather cosmopolitan, and this is so even when, as in his opera of Evgeny Onegin, he takes his sources from Russian literature and uses national Russian musical motifs. But we have lately come to know the splendid and intimately Russian music of Mussorgsky, Borodin, and Rimsky-Korsakov. It came as a revelation, and made us realise that here we have a new birth which has enriched the art, has given it deeper truth and fresh beauty. Their motto was to make art the handmaid of humanity, to " go to the people, seek truth, and the true purpose of life." " To feed upon humanity," Mussorgsky wrote, " is the whole problem of art." In his two greatest works, Boris Godunov and Khovanshchina, he realised his ideal. Alongside of him, and working in the same spirit, came the two others. Borodin, the author of Prince Igor, was a musician with less of tragic intensity but more of serene beauty. Rimsky-Korsakov was the most accomplished musician of the three, and had a special genius for the expression of strong colour