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Russia's gift to the world
Image 20
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 20. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1395.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 20. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1395

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 20, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1395.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_019.jpg
Transcript 18 Russia's Gift to the World MUSIC The development of Russian music affords a close and interesting parallel to the development of Russian literature. Music and song are the natural gift of the Slavonic race. It was so in ancient times and is so now. All travellers in Russia are struck by the beauty and skill of the untaught singing heard everywhere, from the mouths of soldiers or workmen or peasants. This music is based on a natural scale and is harmonised, when sung by several voices, by a sort of popular counterpoint. The melodies of Russia have an unusual fascination. This native music was long hindered m its development by the strong ecclesiastical tradition of the Russian Church, which was rootedly conservative. When the scientific study of music was taken up in the 18th century, the influence of Italian music was dominant throughout Europe. Famous Italian composers like Paisiello, Galuppi, and Cimarosa paid long visits to Russia ; they were in great favour at the Court, and set the fashion throughout the country, so that the native music fell into neglect. It was revived in the great wave of patriotic enthusiasm a hundred years ago, and came to its own in the work of Glinka. Glinka was a contemporary of Pushkin, and their work is intimately connected, for it represents a common national development on parallel lines. His genius created a national idiom for musical expression. In his famous opera, A Life for the lsar (1836), he concentrated the native musical substance and enlarged it to a universal human appeal This movement was continued by Dar- gomyzhsky, who worked on much the same lines as Wagner, but quite independently of him. It is to Dargomyzhsky that we owe the famous sentence, I want the note to be the direct equivalent of the