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Russia's gift to the world
Image 19
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 19. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1394.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 19. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1394

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 19, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1394.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 19
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_018.jpg
Transcript Russia's Gift to the World 17 criticism, who was powerful in moulding the great generation of Russian writers ; Solovev, a brilliant essayist and thinker ; and Yakovlev (better known by his material name of Herzen), a Christian Socialist whose influence was immense in directions that he neither desired nor foresaw, and who is known in literature by his brilliant Memoirs. Three more have been, in part, translated into English, and are better known: Chekhov, the literary descendant of Turgenev, who drew Russian middle- class life with great accuracy and also with a sense of humour ; Gorky, " the Russian Kipling," who introduced a fresh naturalism into Russian letters ; and Merezhkovsky, the author of powerful works ofjiistorical fiction. / In poetry likewise may be named Krylpv the fabulist, who, before Pushkin, gave the first impulse to national self-expression; Lermontov, a poet of the school of Byron, but with a lyrical gift akin to that of Shelley ; Koltsov, " the Russian Burns " ; the delicate and charming lyrics of Alexis Tolstoy ; and Nekrasov, the most popular in Russia of all their poets. Nekrasov might be compared to Longfellow in his simplicity and direct appeal to ordinary people ; but he is in the strongest contrast to Longfellow's cheerful serenity, for his poetry, in its uncompromising realism, is often bitter, and nearly always full of gloom. Yet this temper issued finally in enthusiasm for the people and faith in their ultimate victory. At the present time, as is natural and inevitable, Russian literature seems to be in a time of slack water after the period of the great writers. But it is full of the stirrings of fresh life. As in England, there is large and eager production, manifold experiment, belief in the power of literature to interpret life ; and this gives hope, in both countries, of a new birth and another great age.