Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Russia's gift to the world
Image 16
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 16. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 16. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1391

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 16, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_015.jpg
Transcript 14 Russia's Gift to the World pace with the movements of a new generation. His fame is not so great now as it was thirty years ago, when he had a position, somewhat like Tennyson in England, of unquestioned supremacy. But the strength and charm, the insight and suavity of his art still remain ; and his work stands secure, not only by its beauty but by its strength and truth. In his self-imposed exile he remained a patriot. The Russian language was to him a symbol of Russian life. " When I fall into despair," he wrote, " at the " sight of all that is being done at home, I cannot " but believe that it is to a great people that such " a language has been given." Turgenev represents the Russia of the older time ; Dostoyevsky represents, in strong contrast, the growth, the unrest, and the agonies of the new democracy. His scenes of life are the garret and the street; with their monotony of poverty and suffering. He cannot be read for amusement; his books are disquieting and distressing, but compelling in their power and truth. The typical Russian qualities of patience and humility became in him a passion, almost a fever. His Crime and Punishment had an effect, in Russia and throughout Europe, as great as that of Richardson's Clarissa a century before. They are alike in their slow inevitable movement, their crushing truth, their insight into the dark places of the human soul, and the way in which they work out, relentlessly and in cruel detail, the doctrine of expiation through suffering. Later books, The Idiot, Devils, The Brothers Karamazov, are no less powerful and no less awful. The image of life which he places before us would be horrible but for the sense throughout it all of controlling and overwhelming pity. He searches for the soul of goodness in evil, and so finally leaves a message of dim hope. Tolstoy was probably the most remarkable single figure in the world of his time. He is the one I °**> M »». ,. . m