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Russia's gift to the world
Image 10
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 10. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 8, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1385.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 10. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1385

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 10, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 8, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1385.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_009.jpg
Transcript 8 Russia's Gift to the World is disastrous in its effects upon our whole public policy, upon our own national character, and, which is much more important, upon the common progress and common welfare of mankind. If we were asked, What is the place that Great Britain occupies in the world ? what she has given to mankind, and what is the debt which mankind owes to her ? we might point to the great empire gradually put together, and now held together by goodwill, by a sense of common interest, of friendship, and of kinship ; or to the achievements of Great Britain in industry and commerce and invention, and their effect in increasing the sum of human wealth and of human power over nature ; or to her success in establishing, not merely as an ideal, but as a thing which actually works, the habit of self-government and the freedom of opinion. Or we might point to those national qualities, persistent through political and social changes, which are the basis of daily life : we might speak with Burke of the piety, integrity, good nature, and good humour which underlie the English character, and claim that they contribute certain elements towards a standard of goodness for the whole of mankind. Or once more, we might point to what Great Britain has done in the things of the mind, in letters, in science, and in art. It is this last matter which is most universal in its appeal to the world, and which remains permanently, after hundreds or thousands of years have passed, as the greatest glory of any nation. It is a source of national pride, or rather we might say an impulse towards national endeavour, to realise in these things of the mind the possession of a great inheritance and to feel that we must be worthy of it. 4 In this sphere of things of the mind a country is known by its great names. It takes its place in the world in virtue of what its great writers, artists, '0