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Russia's gift to the world
Image 8
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Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. Russia's gift to the world - Image 8. 1915. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 27, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1383.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945. (1915). Russia's gift to the world - Image 8. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1383

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, Russia's gift to the world - Image 8, 1915, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 27, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1430/show/1383.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Russia's gift to the world
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945
Publisher Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
  • London
Date 1915
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 48 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location DK32.7.M3 1915
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304497~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1315132_007.jpg
Transcript Russia's Gift to the World like ourselves, pure Aryans ; they are cousins of the Latins and the Celts and the Germans, and have exactly the same claim as these other nations to be counted European. The countries occupied by them used at one time to extend all over Northern Germany as far west as the Elbe, and even now there are Slav peoples in large numbers in the heart of Central Europe. So, too, about their language. The Russian language, which is spoken (with some varieties of dialect) by more than 100,000,000 people, is one of the richest and noblest of human languages. It provides as valuable a mental discipline as any other modern language, perhaps even as Greek or Latin, and it is a language in which many great works of literature, as we shall see later, have been written. Not only is there great ignorance of Russia in England, but, as always is the result of ignorance, great misunderstanding. The popular notions about Russia are not only imperfect but absurd. They are derived partly from a distorted legend of the Crimean War, partly from sympathy with nationalities or causes which the Russian Government has treated badly, and very largely from fiction. This last is not even Russian fiction, but the fiction of English or French writers who were wholly ignorant of Russia. The Russian nobleman, the Russian spy, the Russian conspirator, as they are popularly conceived, are figures of melodrama or of comic opera, not of actual life. To novel writers Russia has been a happy hunting ground, where they could lay on their colours as they chose and make scenes as fantastic as those of the Arabian Nights. Broadly, the impression produced by this combined ignorance and misconception is that not of a nation, still less of a nation working together with others for the objects and ideals of civilisation. It is of a vast, shapeless mass of barbarism tyrannised over by a small governing class which itself