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The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism
Image 31
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Dannenberg, Karl. The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 31. 1919. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1365.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Dannenberg, Karl. (1919). The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 31. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1365

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Dannenberg, Karl, The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 31, 1919, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1365.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Dannenberg, Karl
Publisher Literature Bureau of the Workers' International Industrial Union
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Detroit, Michigan
Date 1919
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
  • Labor unions
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 33 pages: chart; 17 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.D25 1919
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304529~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 31
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12374394_030.jpg
Transcript CONSTRUCTIVE ELEMENTS OF SOCIALISM 29 inaugurate 111 different or separate strikes at 111 different periods against the six closely amalgamated basic economic interests of the exploiters; and these advocates of a fossilized Unionism are keenly surprised, when they are also thoroughly trounced or beaten on 111 different occasions.' The A. F. of L., consequently, furnishes a classical example of a method of organization as it could not have been more efficiently conceived in the period of capitalist craft interests, which, however, appears antiquated and actually suicidal when compared with the highly developed and perfectly centralized industrial unity of modern Capitalism. When we compare the weapons of the A. F. of L. with the ones of the capitalist oligarchy, the tragic example of the wild tribes, which thought of vanquishing the modern equipped regiments of "civilization" with the bow and arrow, enters into our minds. In contradistinction to the antiquated and unscientific principle of craft-simpledom, Industrial Unionism does not organize the workers along the lines of their specific craft, not according to the tool they happen to be using or the quality of material they are working upon, but according to the character of the products they are creating, i.e., according to the output of the industry in which they are engaged. As an example let us compare the methods employed by Craft Unionism with those of Industrial Unionism in the organization of a printery. The A. F. of L. would organize a modern printing plant in the following manner: The linotype operators would be organized in the International Typographical Union; the printers and pressmen would become members of the International Printing Pressmen's and Assistant's Union of North America; the bookbinders would affiliate with the International Brotherhood of Bookbinders; the photographers would have to join the International Photo En-