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The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism
Image 30
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Dannenberg, Karl. The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 30. 1919. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1364.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Dannenberg, Karl. (1919). The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 30. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1364

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Dannenberg, Karl, The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 30, 1919, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1364.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Dannenberg, Karl
Publisher Literature Bureau of the Workers' International Industrial Union
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Detroit, Michigan
Date 1919
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
  • Labor unions
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 33 pages: chart; 17 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.D25 1919
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304529~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 30
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12374394_029.jpg
Transcript 28 THE ROAD TO POWER basic productive powers, or six general economic branches, unite in themselves all the economic functions of our so manifold and "complicated" industrial life. Of. course, these departments are again divided into certain sub-divisions like, for instance, the Department of Manufacture and General Production, which contains seven of such subdivisions. However, all these varied subsidiary branches run into one of the six basic Industrial Departments, which again are only integral parts of one big organism. The revolutionary effects of this modern and competent principle of organization, effects which in their very nature are bound to be profound and far reaching, have, strange to say, seemingly left the American Federation of Labor absolutely immune. As we glean from the American Labor Year Book, the American Federation of Labor, in 1917, consisted of 111 national and international Craft Unions and five so-called departments. These departments, however, are not organized along the principles of Industrial Unionism, but represent nothing else than a higher developed form of the Craft Union principle, which has amalgamated certain Craft Unions into a department, not because they jointly produce the same product, but because they jointly work upon or consume the same raw material. However, we must not overlook, the A. F. of L., the largest labor organization in America, still consisted in 1917 of 111 national and international Craft Unions which were only loosely federated or organically consolidated with each other; and that the 111 craft interests were again split into 26,761 local craft organizations, with as many local craft interests. In other words: Here we perceive 111 autonomous, i.e., independent Craft Unions, eagerly guarding 111 craft interests, that probably enter into 111 different contracts, expiring at 111 different dates with the capitalists, and which again give birth and