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The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism
Image 18
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Dannenberg, Karl. The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 18. 1919. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1352.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Dannenberg, Karl. (1919). The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 18. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1352

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Dannenberg, Karl, The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 18, 1919, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1352.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Dannenberg, Karl
Publisher Literature Bureau of the Workers' International Industrial Union
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Detroit, Michigan
Date 1919
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
  • Labor unions
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 33 pages: chart; 17 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.D25 1919
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304529~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 18
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12374394_017.jpg
Transcript 16 THE ROAD TO POWER not be too emphatically underscored that the power of the proletariat does not in the last analysis rest in the form or structure, but the spirit of an organization. Consequently, when certain Socialists attribute revolutionary vitality and creative power to Industrial Unionism as Industrial Unionism, without qualifying it with the word Socialist, then they commit precisely the same error which certain pure and simple politicians fall into, when they seek to "organize the masses into a large political party," however, in their anxiety for success forgetting and ignoring entirely the Socialist character of the organization. Primarily, it is not the question whether the workers are organized on the economic field along craft or industrial lines, because we have both forms of organization in existence now (see Germany and America for classical examples) ; neither, whether the workers engage in independent politics, such politics having been carried on for years by so-called liberal reform movements and alleged "Socialist" parties; but whether the economic and political activity is a Socialist activity; whether the industrial union is a class-conscious union; and whether the Socialist political party is a truly working-class organization. The yardstick with which to establish the status of a workers' organization has been provided in our previous article, and is to be found in the organization's conception of Capitalism and the consequent interpretation of the class struggle resulting therefrom. To a revolutionary Socialist only such an organization is considered class-conscious which affirms unequivocally the inability of the workers to permanently improve their economic and social conditions under Capitalism, calling upon the workers to marshal their forces on the economic as well as political field under the banner of not palliation or reform, but revolution. Organ-