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The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism
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Dannenberg, Karl. The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 17. 1919. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Dannenberg, Karl. (1919). The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 17. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1351

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Dannenberg, Karl, The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism - Image 17, 1919, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1375/show/1351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The road to power, or, the constructive elements of socialism
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Dannenberg, Karl
Publisher Literature Bureau of the Workers' International Industrial Union
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Detroit, Michigan
Date 1919
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
  • Labor unions
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 33 pages: chart; 17 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.D25 1919
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304529~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 17
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12374394_016.jpg
Transcript CONSTRUCTIVE ELEMENTS OF SOCIALISM 15 respective social power. We can at least venture to assert that it has brought home the so important truism that all political or social influence, exercised by a social category in a particular historic period, is but a reflex of its economic influence or might, i. e., that political power or governmental control does not conquer and cement the industrial supremacy and hegemony for a class, but, on the contrary, that the industrial supremacy of a class* is also bound to ultimately insure political power and governmental domination to it. The proper recognition of this fact by the proletariat—a fact which can be amply substantiated by historic and sociological examples—will eventually compel this class to organize and conduct its struggle against Capitalism accordingly. This further implies that the proper appreciation of this fundamental proposition will henceforth actuate the class-conscious workers to concentrate their energies upon the organization of their economic power; and this attempt will again animate them to seek to establish the original source of this potential force in the working-class. In the aforementioned chapters we emphasized that the economic power of the workers did not rest in some form of ownership or property prerogative, as is and was the case with all previous ruling classes, but in the recognition of their economic worth or indispensability—in their class- consciousness. From this deduction it follows that the economic and social influence or power of the proletariat is not, as it has been so often erroneously asserted, to be found in the form or particular function of an organization, but in its spirit and theoretical composition. Not the form or particular functions will affect and determine the principles of an organization, but the principles will determine the form and functions. Therefore, it can-