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Democratic platforms
Image 2
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Democratic platforms - Image 2. 1900?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1334/show/1331.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1900?). Democratic platforms - Image 2. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1334/show/1331

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Democratic platforms - Image 2, 1900?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1334/show/1331.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Democratic platforms
Publisher Allied Printing Trades Council
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Date 1900?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Democratic Party (U.S.)
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Campaign literature
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 4 unnumbered pages; 23 cm.
Original Item Location E738.D45
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304555~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_23029470_001.jpg
Transcript rule at an earlier period than was ever given to any previous addition of American territory, unless possibly Texas. It treated the Porto Rican people with more liberality than was shown to the residents of the Louisiana Purchase, of New Mexico, of California, of Alaska, of Hawaii or of any of the other annexed portions. As for the tax, the form of burden for the support of their own government easiest for the Porto Ricans to bear was chosen, and the duration of it was limited to a little more than a year with the option given to the Porto Ricans of substituting another form at any time. The manner in which the Porto Ricans have accepted the new order of things best answers the Democratic declaration that this is "the first act of its imperialistic programme." THE FREEDOH OF CUBA. 44 We demand the prompt and honest fulfillment of our pledge to the Cuban people." Within twenty months from the date of occupation the island from end to end is under the rule of native municipal officials chosen through popular suffrage. The police power is exercised entirely by native organizations. The troops have been reduced from 35,000 to 5,000, and some of the 5,000 are under orders to return to the United States. A few American officials remain at the heads of civil and military bureaus with Cuban assistants and subordinates. The order has been issued for an election of members of a convention to draft a constitution for Cuba. The time of the election has been set. There is only satisfaction expressed by Cubans at the manner in which the United States is keeping its pledge. THE PHILIPPINE POLICY. 44 We condemn and denounce the Philippine policy. It has involved the republic in unnecessary war." Historical evidence is conclusive to all fair-minded citizens tkat hostilities were begun by a general attack upon the American troops holding Manila, against the purpose of Aguinaldo, avowed in writing, to loot that great city. 44 We favor an immediate declaration of the nation's purpose to give to the Filipinos: first, a stable form of government." That declaration was made by proclamation before hostilities began, and was coupled with the pledge of the largest possible measure of home rule. 44 Second, independence. »» Such a declaration could only be made by Congress. There has been no time when such action would have been indorsed by a majority of the people of the United States, and there are no indications that the majority will favor it. 44 Third, protection from outside interference, such as has been given for nearly a century to the republics of Central America and South America." It is for the American people to say whether this Government shall undertake the extension of the Monroe doctrine to Asia in behalf of an independent country there, with all that such application of the doctrine may imply in the way of force.