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The life and work of Friedrich Engels
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Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 51. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1109.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. (1920). The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 51. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1109

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969, The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 51, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1109.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The life and work of Friedrich Engels
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969
Publisher The Communist party of Great Britain
Date 1920
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Engels, Friedrich, 1820-1895
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 51 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location HX276.E6C6 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302356~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 51
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12044654_050.jpg
Transcript of Friedrich Engels 47 Failure of Second International All his life Engels had been an incurable optimist and ever saw the imminence of the revolution. This is seen throughout his letters to Sorge in the latter years of his life. In 1895, the year of his death, he wrote enthusiastically of the progress made by the Socialist parties of all countries and of his hopes of the International. From its first foundation Engels had hoped very great things from the Second International. And he had reason to do so at the time. One could not have foreseen then, that all its fine international sentiments and phrases would fall together like a pack of cards on the first war cry of the capitalist masters of the world. The Second International fell on the outbreak of war, because it had outlived its time. It had grown to be a body of comfortable representatives of, on the whole, safe and comfortable Socialist movements. It represented very largely a parlour socialism which had become fairly respectable. The First International had fallen because the Socialist parties of which it had been composed had outgrown their then narrow international connection and required a period to develop nationally before they could again unite into a fuller international organisation: the First International fell because its sections were not yet sufficiently developed nationally. Similarly, the Second International fell because it was not sufficiently developed internationally for the growing national Socialist parties, and the needs of the times. It lacked international organisation, enthusiasm, ideals, and consciousness. A friend of the writer of these lines, an old Russian exile, and, theoretically, a good Marxian to wit, once told her in confidence (as the friend in question is now dead—luckily he died after the outbreak of revolution in Russia, and lived to go back to his native country and to see it with his own eyes—there can be no objection to mentioning what he said now) that although he worked in the movement, although he did all he could by pen and mouth to advance Socialism, in his heart of hearts he had little faith in the realisation of Socialism within measurable distance. He worked as he did more out of habit and because he could not bring himself to avow his feelings to his Socialist friends. Now and again he was buoyed up by hope, but on the whole he had little faith. At the time one could assume that this was an exception— that it was merely a mood brought on by pessimism due to the miserable economic position of the friend in question—for the life of a poor Russian exile in London or America was no sweet one. But we can now see that in reality this was no exception, that what this man brought himself to avow to a particular friend, was what a large section of the Second International consciously or unconsciously felt. The movement had outgrown the revolutionary ardour of its youth. The members of the Second International Socialist Bureau, more successful materially than this comrade, continued to talk about revolution, but in their heart of hearts they did not believe in it.