Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The life and work of Friedrich Engels
Image 44
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 44. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1102.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. (1920). The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 44. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1102

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969, The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 44, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1102.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The life and work of Friedrich Engels
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969
Publisher The Communist party of Great Britain
Date 1920
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Engels, Friedrich, 1820-1895
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 51 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location HX276.E6C6 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302356~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 44
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12044654_043.jpg
Transcript 40 The Life and Work munism, since there will no longer be any economic reason for it. If monogamy continues to exist for the woman, for the first time in history it will be equally compulsory for the man. Whilst the private household of the present day, with all its wastefulness and pettiness, will certainly disappear, and children, whether legal or illegal, will be the equal care of the State, yet for the first time in history individual sex-love, which is supposed to form the basis of all marriages and of the monogamic family, will attain to this position in actual fact as well as in theory. Mutual love will then be the only real consideration which will force a couple to live together, and to be true to one another. As for how exactly the men and women of the future will regulate their lives, Engels says: "That will'be decided after a new generation has come to maturity—a race of men who have never in their lives had occasion for buying with money or other economic means of power the surrender of a woman; a race of women who have never had any occasion for surrendering to any man for any other reason but love, or for refusing to surrender to their lover for fear of economic consequences. Once such people are in the world, they will not give a moment's thought to what we to-day believe should be their course. They will follow their own practice and fashion their own public opinion about the individual practice of every person—only this and nothing more." Thus, whilst private ownership in wealth and the means of production, with its concomitant existence of classes and subjection of women, was a necessary result of the accumulation of wealth, it yet bears within itself the germs of its own destruction. Private property and class domination can no longer cope with the problems confronting it. By the rise of the great towns, by the massing together of large numbers of men in factory and workshop, by forcing them to unite in defence of their interests, by the recurrence of trade crises and unemployment, by the production of unheard-of luxuries side by side with the direst misery, by the collective methods of production the owners of private property have themselves been forced to introduce—in short, all the facts of our modern industrial life have been digging and are rapidly completing the grave of private property and the inevitable extinction of all class or sex domination. But if we say that this is inevitable, it does not mean that we are to fold our hands and do nothing. All things in society are brought about by human beings, but the psychology of these human beings is moulded by the economic conditions of the time, and this psychology again reflects and exerts an influence in changing these economic conditions. In pure self-defence, and partly unconsciously, the workers are compelled to carry on a constant class struggle. Some of them are led again by these economic conditions to see the real trend of this struggle, its necessary aim, the doing away with private property, and the establishment of the Socialist