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The life and work of Friedrich Engels
Image 43
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Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 43. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1101.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. (1920). The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 43. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1101

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969, The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 43, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1101.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The life and work of Friedrich Engels
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969
Publisher The Communist party of Great Britain
Date 1920
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Engels, Friedrich, 1820-1895
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 51 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location HX276.E6C6 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302356~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 43
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12044654_042.jpg
Transcript of Friedrich Engels 39 is now in the new industries, and the man who now has to occupy himself as heretofore with obtaining the means of subsistence, now becomes the owner of herds of animals, of the tools for tilling the soil, then, later, also of slaves, and thus, owing to the fact that the household is now no longer a social function, but purely a private one, the man begins to take the first, the woman the second, place in society. At the same time, to insure the inheritance to his own children— since he knew them now—the man used his new power to definitely change the law of inheritance from the mother's to the father's side, thus further strengthening his position in the family and in society. The position of woman in society, as that of every class at a given epoch, thus has nothing to do with her inferiority to man, but is due to the historical development in the modes of obtaining the means of subsistence and the growth of private property. Speaking of the woman's question, Engels says:—"Only by the great industries of our times was the access to social production again opened to women. ♦. ♦ This occurs in such wise as to exclude them from earning anything in public industries, if they fulfil their duties in the private service of the family; or that they are unable to attend to their family duties, if they wish to participate in public industries and earn a living independently. As in the factory, so women are situated in all business departments up to the medical and legal professions. "The modern monogamous family is founded on the open or disguised domestic slavery of women, and modern society is a mass composed of molecules in the form of monogamous families. In the great majority of cases the man has to earn a living and to support his family; he thereby obtains a superior position that has no need of any legal special privilege. In the family he is the bourgeois; the woman represents the proletariat.... It will be seen that the emancipation of women is primarily dependent on the reintroduction of the whole female sex into the public industries. To accomplish this the monogamous family must cease to be the industrial unit of society... ♦ We are now approaching a social revolution in which the old economic foundation of monogamy will disappear just as surely as those of its complement—prostitution. Monogamy arose through the concentration of considerable wealth in one hand—a man's hand—and from the endeavour to bequeath this wealth to the children of this man to the exclusion of all others. This necessitated monogamy on the woman's part, not on the man's part.. ♦. Now, the impending social revolution will reduce this whole case of inheritance to a minimum by changing at least the overwhelming part of permanent and inheritable wealth—the means of production—into social property." As to the question whether monogamy will survive when the economic reason for its existence has disappeared, Engels, refusing to prophesy and to indulge in useless speculation, simply points out that prostitution must certainly disappear with the introduction of Com-