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The life and work of Friedrich Engels
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Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 41. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1099.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. (1920). The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 41. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1099

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969, The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 41, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1099.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The life and work of Friedrich Engels
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969
Publisher The Communist party of Great Britain
Date 1920
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Engels, Friedrich, 1820-1895
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 51 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location HX276.E6C6 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302356~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 41
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12044654_040.jpg
Transcript of Friedrich Engels 37 Ancient Society was treated in the same way by the spokesmen of prehistoric science in England. "My work can offer only a meagre substitute for that which my departed friend was not destined to accomplish. ♦ ♦." Needless to say, in this short booklet we cannot give any adequate resume of this work, but in view of its interest and importance we shall attempt to give as much as space will permit. By filling in the gaps in Morgan's investigation, by working on the rich material in Ancient Society on the development of the gens and the family, and by applying to it the materialistic conception of history, Engels traces in this book the development of the family from the early group marriage through various stages corresponding with the economic development of society, to its present monogamic form. Like every other existing institution of society hallowed by time and the convenience of the governing class, the present form of the family is looked upon as a divinely ordained institution, or as the most natural form of relation between the sexes without any relation to our particular form of society. As a matter of fact, however, the family, like every other social institution, has had a long history, and has developed in accordance with the development of society and the growth of private property. The earliest form of the family corresponding to the state of savagery was that of group marriages. As society progressed to the state of society known as barbarism, we have the pairing family, in which each man has a principal wife, and to the wife this man is her principal husband. The marriage of near relations was more and more prohibited, but so long as society was organised in the form of gentes, the family in the modern sense did not exist. On the contrary, we have the communistic form of the household, in which most or all the women belonged to one and the same gens, while the husbands came from various gentes. In these households, the women naturally played a leading role and were anything but the slave of man. Thus, says Arthur Wright, quoted by Engels: "The female part generally ruled the house; the provisions were held in common, but woe to the luckless husband or lover who was too indolent or too clumsy to contribute his share to the common stock. No matter how many children, or how much private property he had in the house, he was liable at any moment to receive a hint to gather up his belongings and get out. And he could not venture to resist. The house was made too hot for him, and he had no other choice but to return to his own clan (gens), or, as was mostly the case, to look for another wife in some other clan. The women were the dominating power in the gentes (clans) and everywhere else. Occasionally they did not hesitate to dethrone a chief and degrade him to a common warrior." But the growth of wealth and of private property changed all this. How great a role the question of property already played in later