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The life and work of Friedrich Engels
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Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 30. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1088.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. (1920). The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 30. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1088

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969, The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 30, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1088.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The life and work of Friedrich Engels
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969
Publisher The Communist party of Great Britain
Date 1920
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Engels, Friedrich, 1820-1895
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 51 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location HX276.E6C6 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302356~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 30
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12044654_029.jpg
Transcript 26 The Life and Work "even should the revolution not come in between and make an end to all financial projects." Marx undoubtedly understood the sacrifice Engels was making, and in reply to this letter, after expressing his own hope and belief (which, however, in a material sense, was not fulfilled) that in another year he would be a made man and would be able to stand on his own feet financially, he says, amongst other things, "Without you I could never have brought the work (Capital) to a conclusion, and I assure you that a load like a mountain has always lain on my mind: that chiefly on my account you have allowed your splendid powers to go to waste and to grow rusty in commerce." Already in 1865, after describing his sad economic position at the moment—-debts, etc. (and Engels, as always, came to the rescue as far as he possibly could)—Marx deplores his dependent position, and says: "The only thought that sustains me in it all is that we two form a sort of business company in which I give my time to the theoretical and the party section of the business." And it was so indeed. Engels' sacrifice was not only for the friend in whom he recognised genius of the highest order, but it was also a noble sacrifice of his own inclinations and powers for the purpose of furthering the interests of the party, and the ideals both he and Marx had at heart. In addition, when in the beginning of 1851 Marx was invited to write for the New York Tribune, Engels was of great assistance. In the first place, at that time Marx was not yet a sufficient master of the English language to write in English. Engels, therefore, translated his articles for him. Secondly, when Marx had no time to write, or was unwell, or when the question to be dealt with was a military one, or anything more in Engels' domain, Engels wrote the article himself. Often enough Engels would write one or two articles during the week in addition to his work in the office and all his other studies and writings. These articles all went to the Tribune under Marx's signature and highly valued they were (though miserably paid) whether they came from Marx's or Engels' pen. January 5,1854, Marx writes to Engels telling him that his military articles (on the position of affairs in the Crimean War, printed by the Tribune as leading articles on November 15 and December 16, 1853) had made a "great stir and have been attributed to General Scot" (a leading military authority at that time). In the spring of 1854, Engels seemed for a while to have had great hopes of getting well paid work on the Daily News, and he was already making joyous plans for throwing up his commercial life and coming back to London. Unfortunately, the plan came to nothing, and, much to his disgust, Engels had to remain at his Manchester office. Early the following year Marx's only boy, a very gifted but delicate child, fell ill and died. Marx, writing to Engels, says in one letter: "I cannot thank you enough for the friendship with which you con-