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The life and work of Friedrich Engels
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Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 25. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1083.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. (1920). The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 25. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1083

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969, The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 25, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1083.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The life and work of Friedrich Engels
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969
Publisher The Communist party of Great Britain
Date 1920
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Engels, Friedrich, 1820-1895
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 51 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location HX276.E6C6 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302356~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 25
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12044654_024.jpg
Transcript of Friedrich Engels 21 Germany, where a violent collision—which might, perhaps, be forced on the people—should have, at the very least, the advantage that it would destroy the spirit of subservience which has permeated the national mind ever since the degradation and humiliation of the Thirty Years' War." The reader can himself make the necessary substitutions for Germany in the above passage. Constitutional Risings in Germany The working classes failed to get their political liberties in the 1848 revolutions: the reaction triumphed. But they learned some valuable lessons: they learnt to recognise the unreliability of the small property-owners; their treachery, and the need to rely on themselves alone as a class in their struggle with the bourgeoisie. Of course, the subsequent history of Europe shows that this lesson was not learnt thoroughly by all sections of the workers in all Europe; but the foremost ranks of the workers did learn the lesson, and after a short respite from the shock of their defeat there commenced a more definitely class-conscious action amongst the European working class. In May, 1849, a portion of the Rhine province broke out in revolt, and as soon as Engels heard of this he hastened to the seat of action, to Elberfeld; but the workers being betrayed by the small bourgeoisie, the rising soon fizzled out. The Neue Rheinische Zeitung was suppressed, and after remaining in hiding in Cologne for a short time, Engels went to the Palatinate, which had risen, together with Baden, for a constitution for the whole German Empire. Here he joined a volunteer corps as adjutant. But this rising also failed, owing to the mismanagement and treachery of the South German Democrats—a small bourgeois party, which, supported by the workers, had led the rising. And it ended, as described by Engels, by a bloody massacre. Engels stopped with the conquered army to the very last, until all was hopelessly lost. He then went to Switzerland. The day after he arrived at Vevey, he writes to Mrs. Marx explaining his long silence, and the course of the rising. Although, he says, he had at first tried to stand aside from this soi-disant revolution, still, when he heard that the Prussians had come he could not keep himself from entering the ranks. Although he does not think much of the rising, on the whole he is glad that one from the Neue Rheinische Zeitung had taken part; otherwise the democrats might have denounced them as being too cowardly to fight. He is very anxious as to what has become of Marx, and says: "If only I were certain that Marx is free! I have often thought that there, in the midst of the Prussian bullets, I was in a much less dangerous post after all than the others in Germany, and particularly than Marx in Paris. Please relieve me immediately from this uncertainty." In reply, Marx tells Engels how anxious they had been on his account