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The life and work of Friedrich Engels
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Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 22. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1080.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. (1920). The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 22. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1080

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969, The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 22, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1080.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The life and work of Friedrich Engels
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969
Publisher The Communist party of Great Britain
Date 1920
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Engels, Friedrich, 1820-1895
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 51 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location HX276.E6C6 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302356~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 22
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12044654_021.jpg
Transcript i8 The Life and Work political freedom; that, these gained, the chains would at once fall from the people, and they would live thereafter in peace and prosperity. Needless to say, both Marx and Engels called for energetic action for the attainment of political liberties, for the overthrow of the reaction—but this only for the purpose of preparing the ground for the real struggle of the workers for their emancipation from capitalist domination. For Engels as for Marx, democracy without Communism was no democracy. "Any other democracy" (not Communism), said Engels, "can only exist in the heads of visionary theoreticians, who do not bother about realities, and according to whom men and circumstances do not develop principles, but principles develop of themselves. Democracy has become a proletarian principle—the principle of the masses." But for this democracy to have any value, it must be Communist, not bourgeois, democracy. It may not be out of place to say a few words here as to this democracy whose praises we hear sung now on all sides, including such sturdy democrats as King George, Lloyd George, Bonar Law and so on, and so on. Our ideas on democracy illustrate admirably the way in which all our thoughts and ideas are coloured by the prevailing economic conditions and the interests of the governing class. Of course, it is true, in the abstract, that if the working class desired to do so they could simply, by using their vote, set up a Socialist, even a Communist, Government, and proceed to carry out any measure of reform they desired, and even to abolish the private ownership in the means of production and to Socialise them by orderly parliamentary methods. But a moment's reflection must surely convince us that democracy, as it exists at the present time, is a mere sham so far as the workers are concerned. In the first place,the school and pulpit are in the hands of the governing class,who quite naturally use them as far as they can to inculcate views in their own interests. The Press, which is the most powerful moulder of public opinion, is again in the hands of the capitalist class. For one Socialist or Labour paper there are hundreds of Liberal, Tory, Radical—in short, bourgeois—papers, all inculcating the morals, ideas and ideals of the governing class, whatever particular name or method they may adopt in doing this. The Labour forces have not at their command the halls, motor-cars, and vast sums of money spent on supporting bourgeois candidates. The electoral machinery and institutions, too, are so contrived that it is the Government—the representatives of the ruling classes—that chooses the issues and the moment of the elections. The consequence is that democracy in a bourgeois society simply tends to strengthen the position and interests of the bourgeoisie by giving to its domination the apparent sanction of the popular vote. Engels, therefore, truly says in his Origin of the Family, which we shall