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The life and work of Friedrich Engels
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Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 21. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1079.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969. (1920). The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 21. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1079

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969, The life and work of Friedrich Engels - Image 21, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1119/show/1079.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The life and work of Friedrich Engels
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Coates, Zelda K. (Zelda Kahan), 1886-1969
Publisher The Communist party of Great Britain
Date 1920
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Engels, Friedrich, 1820-1895
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 51 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location HX276.E6C6 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302356~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 21
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12044654_020.jpg
Transcript of Friedrich Engels 17 we should like to give from the Introduction to it written by Engels for the 1888 edition, merely to show how the wheel of time, and the present revolutionary era through which we are passing, has, so far as party names are concerned, brought us back very much to the position of 1848. After pointing out that at that time (1888) the manifesto was undoubtedly the most widespread, the most international production of all Socialist literature, Engels says: "Yet when it was written we could not have called it a Socialist manifesto. By Socialists, in 1847, were understood, on the one hand, the adherents of the various Utopian systems: Owenites in England, Fourierists in France, both of them already reduced to the position of mere sects and gradually dying out; on the other hand, the multifarious social quacks, who, by all manners of tinkering, professed to redress, without any danger to capital and profits, all sorts of social grievances; in both cases, men outside the working-class movement and looking rather to the 'educated' classes for support. "Whatever portions of the working class had become convinced of the insufficiency of mere political revolutions and had proclaimed the necessity of a total social change, that portion then called itself Communist. It was a crude, rough-hewn, purely instinctive Communism; still, it touched the cardinal point. Thus, Socialism was in 1847 a middle-class movement. Socialism was on the Continent at least 'respectable,' Communism was the very opposite; and as our notion from the very beginning was that' the emancipation of the working class must be the act of the working class itself,' there could be no doubt as to which of the two names we must take. Moreover, we have ever since been far from repudiating it." Do not the last lines strike a familiar note? When we reflect how most of the official Socialist parties have dragged Socialism through the mud of Jingoism, Nationalism, and Opportunism during and since the war, and how, on the contrary, the glorious Russian Revolution has sanctified for us the name and idea of Communism, and how all that is best and most virile in the Socialist movement of nearly all the countries of the world have instinctively readopted the Communist title, we see that we have as much, indeed more, reason to drop the too "respectable" title Socialist and proudly proclaim ourselves Communists. We shall have occasion later to make one more quotation from this preface. For the present we need say no more. Bourgeois and Proletarian Democracy After the second Congress, which established the first International on a firm scientific basis, Engels and Marx went to Paris and thence to Germany, where they established the Neue Rheinische Zeitung in Cologne. Here they worked both practically and theoretically at combating the illusions of the revolutionaries of 1848, who for the most part thought that all that was needed was the gaining of civil and B 1