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Why I left the church
Image 29
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McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. Why I left the church - Image 29. 1912. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1038.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. (1912). Why I left the church - Image 29. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1038

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955, Why I left the church - Image 29, 1912, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1038.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I left the church
Series Title Pamphlets for the million; no. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Rationalist Press Association
Publisher Watts & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1912
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Catholic ex-priests
  • Personal narratives
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location BX4668.3.M33A3 1912
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304505~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 29
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_5792348_028.jpg
Transcript \ WHY I LEFT THE CHURCH 29 taneously perceived; the act of reasoning is still more complex. In fine, there is a supreme unity of the whole psychic life apparently pointing to the absolute unity and simplicity of its substratum, whereas the nervous system becomes increasingly complex. That is the argument which finds most favour with scientifically-minded spiritualists. However, my professor at Lou vain and several of the most distinguished Catholic philosophers rejected it, and through their criticism I came to see its weakness— its confusion of undividedness and indivisibility. A suggestion of Professor Huxley had alwrays troubled me—the brain might not actually be a congeries of separate atoms. It is possible that the ether which ultimately composes the brain may be continuous; if so, the basis of the argument is destroyed. In any case, granting that consciousness may possibly be an efflorescence of nerve- tissue, there seemed no great difficulty, when the nervous system is thoroughly studied, in ascribing the unity of conscious life to the unity of the nervous system. Thus my criterion proved faulty, and I am unable to find any other grave reason for thinking that a spiritual and impei^shable substance underlies our mental life. The apparent freedom of the will dissolves upon a careful study of the relation of motive to voluntary action. The power of reflection, from which springs the artistic faculty, does not present serious difficulty when we are dealing with a highly developed nervous system, once the initial difficulty of consciousness is overcome. Much emphasis is