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Why I left the church
Image 28
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McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. Why I left the church - Image 28. 1912. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1037.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. (1912). Why I left the church - Image 28. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1037

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955, Why I left the church - Image 28, 1912, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1037.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I left the church
Series Title Pamphlets for the million; no. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Rationalist Press Association
Publisher Watts & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1912
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Catholic ex-priests
  • Personal narratives
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location BX4668.3.M33A3 1912
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304505~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_5792348_027.jpg
Transcript I \ I / 2g . WHY I LEFT THE CHURCH wear a different aspect. However that may be, it is not proved that consciousness may not have arisen from an improved nervous structure; and, until that is done, it is unlawful to introduce a new, immaterial element into animal nature. The history of the past and the elementary rules of logic forbid it. As we.ascend the scale of the animal kingdom, mere consciousness, irritability, takes the form of definite perception of external objects. We are justified (in spite of Cartesians) in attributing sensitive perceptions like our own to the higher classes of animals at least. Now, it appeared to me that sensation was the rock which would mark the limit of progress and Materialism. It mattered little whether we could say precisely where definite sensitive perception began or not; wherever it began, we had the impassable frontier of the immaterial world. There seemed to be an indivisibility in the perceptive principle which clearly precluded the possibility of its being material, for matter is as clearly compound and divisible. We perceive an object whole and entire at a glance; something within us must unify the various parts of the object, and perceive them simultaneously. If the brain is a sensitised plate on which the impression of the object is made, each atom contained in the cellule, or group of cellules, over which the impression is spread would have its share of the impression ; but must there not be some simple, indivisible principle pervading the brain substantially united to it to explain the synthesis of these partial perceptions? Two objects are united in a judgment, and simul-