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Why I left the church
Image 24
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McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. Why I left the church - Image 24. 1912. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1033.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. (1912). Why I left the church - Image 24. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1033

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955, Why I left the church - Image 24, 1912, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1033.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I left the church
Series Title Pamphlets for the million; no. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Rationalist Press Association
Publisher Watts & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1912
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Catholic ex-priests
  • Personal narratives
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location BX4668.3.M33A3 1912
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304505~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 24
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_5792348_023.jpg
Transcript ill! WHY I LEFT THE CHURCH .ition when it deals with the origin of human P^lligence. To show that a mechanical or mon- IStic view of the universe and an acceptance of w evolution cannot include man, it is necessary to point to certain of his characteristics, which reveal the presence in him of a new and specifically distinct principle. Until that is done the claims which evolution and mechanism derive from their already universal application cannot be set aside. Difficulties in their application there will be; but difficulties, as theologians so loudly protest in other matters, are not objections. The philosophy which I taught was, of course, essentially dualistic: it takes a middle course between Materialism and Berkeleian Idealism. Moreover, it teaches that the human soul is not an isolated spirit, as in Plato's and Descartes' teaching, in absolute contrast to the rest of the universe; the immaterial world is interwoven much more intimately with the material. The problem, therefore, on which my mind was exercised, and in the solution ot which I came to my present attitude, was to establish clearly the frontiers of the immaterial world, where we could confidently face the rising tide of scientific naturalism, and say: "Here shall the proud waves break." For I thought there was no sadder sight in the history of the century than the retreat of our apologists from the untenable pos.t.ons they successively occupied. Not only ^vas this the case in Scripture and history, but it was conspicuously true in those provinces of philosophy which they once peopled with immaterial principles. Whatever may be said of conservatism