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Why I left the church
Image 23
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McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. Why I left the church - Image 23. 1912. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1032.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. (1912). Why I left the church - Image 23. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1032

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955, Why I left the church - Image 23, 1912, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1032.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I left the church
Series Title Pamphlets for the million; no. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Rationalist Press Association
Publisher Watts & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1912
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Catholic ex-priests
  • Personal narratives
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location BX4668.3.M33A3 1912
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304505~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_5792348_022.jpg
Transcript WHY I LEFT THE CHURCH 23 the present century—has been pressed intc the service of spiritualist philosophers. But, if there is one point on which science has shaken the confidence of men in traditional teaching, it is on this question of the possession by man of an immaterial soul. Metaphysics is, from the nature of the case, the ultimate court of appeal in such a question; the crude assertion that scientists reject the soul because the microscope, the skio- graph, or the scalpel has never revealed it, is one of the choice expressions invented by theologians, who never read scientists, for the satisfaction of their people, whom they will not allow to read them. Neither literally not metaphorically is it a correct statement of the case. The truth is that there are twTo forces at work in modern physical science, which proceed satisfactorily until wTe come to human psychology, and which the scientist is naturally loth to relinquish at this point until the gravest possible reasons are shown for respecting the immunity claimed for it. On the one hand we have the law of unity or parsimony, the tendency to restrict as far as possible the number of ultimate factors of the universe; this is a natural protest of a sounder scientific spirit against the reckless multiplication of forces and principles of less enlightened ages, when all different sets of phenomena were attributed at once to radically distinct principles, and supposed to be explained. On the other hand, there is the law of evolution—the most brilliant discovery of the nineteenth century—which has shed so marvellous a light on the past history of the world, and which now only encounters serious v