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Why I left the church
Image 12
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McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. Why I left the church - Image 12. 1912. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1021.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. (1912). Why I left the church - Image 12. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1021

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955, Why I left the church - Image 12, 1912, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1021.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I left the church
Series Title Pamphlets for the million; no. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Rationalist Press Association
Publisher Watts & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1912
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Catholic ex-priests
  • Personal narratives
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location BX4668.3.M33A3 1912
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304505~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_5792348_011.jpg
Transcript 12 WHY J LEFT THE CHURCH they take this traditional doctrine with little or no proof; or that, from an instinctive feeling of the difficulty of the problem, they readily acquiesce in the most superficial arguments; or, from a confusion of the provinces of faith and reason, they consider it unlawful to indulge in speculation on the problem at all. But the more reflective, and their number is legion now, know that faith—the acceptance of a doctrine on divine authority—necessarily presupposes a knowledge of God, acquired and verifiable by rational methods. Hence it is that from the very dawn of philosophy, from the earliest days when the human mind became capable of taking a larger and more penetrating survey of its environment, it has been actively engaged in constructing a bridge from the visible world to its supposed invisible Maker. We have now before us, in every form, from the ponderous tome of the mediaeval theologian to the penny tract, a curious and extensive collection of arguments for the existence of God—as strange and conflicting a group as the forms which that higher power has successfully assumed in the changeful consciousness of men. There is a point in this numerical multiplication of arguments. We are asked to take them as so many converging lines of inquiry, so that, even if individually they seem unable to bear a strict logical analysis, a strong probability arises from the mere fact of their convergence towards a common centre. This is the argument of Cardinal Newman's famous Grammar of Assent. But there is little value in such a contention; we are only too familiar, from the history of science and philosophy, with the