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Why I left the church
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McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. Why I left the church - Image 7. 1912. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1016.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955. (1912). Why I left the church - Image 7. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1016

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955, Why I left the church - Image 7, 1912, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1058/show/1016.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I left the church
Series Title Pamphlets for the million; no. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Rationalist Press Association
Publisher Watts & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1912
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Catholic ex-priests
  • Personal narratives
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • McCabe, Joseph, 1867-1955
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location BX4668.3.M33A3 1912
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304505~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_5792348_006.jpg
Transcript WHY I LEFT THE CHURCH sciences that deal with those aspects of human life which do unquestionably demand our regulation. Numbers are still struggling in the field of conflict, giving expression, in the melancholy note that marks contemporary fiction and poetry, to the pain and weariness of the barren discussion. Nothing is more persistently depicted in literature than the wrestling of a strong soul with a vanishing belief; nothing, we may infer, touches more deeply the great heart of humanity that loves to see itself reflected in literature. However, the purpose of the following pages is not so much to survey and summarise the results of modern thought in its bearings upon the religious question as to trace out the progress of an individual mind in its long search after truth on religious matters. The story is familiar enough nowadays, but it seems not unwelcome at any time, and in the writer's case it would appear to be attended by circumstances that lend it a peculiar interest. It is the history of a mind that has traversed painfully the whole field of religious controversy, having moved from the most dogmatic of existing sects to a purely negative or agnostic attitude; of one, moreover, who has been placed in a particularly advantageous position for surveying the field of controversy, and whose only ambition it was, for years, to become an apologist for the creed he has been forced to abandon. And the change has been wrought, strange to say, almost exclusively from the study of religious evidences in themselves, without the aid of antagonistic writers, whose wTorks are jealously excluded under the narrow-minded despot- I