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Modern science and anarchism
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Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921. Modern science and anarchism - Image 105. 1912. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1009/show/997.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921. (1912). Modern science and anarchism - Image 105. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1009/show/997

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921, Modern science and anarchism - Image 105, 1912, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1009/show/997.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Modern science and anarchism
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921
Publisher Freedom Press
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1912
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Anarchism
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 110 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location HX915.K93 1912
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304395~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 105
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_174052_104.jpg
Transcript Glossary. 101 I, reason. Having been very nearly involved in a prosecution with his friends, accused of Jacobinism and Republicanism, Godwin left out of the second edition of his work on Political Justice all that he had written in a Communist sense in the first edition. Grove, William Robert (1811-1896), an English physicist; wrote in 1842 a most remarkable memoir, and in 1856 a book, on the unity of the physical forces, in which he proved that sound, heat, light, electricity, magnetism, and chemical action are not separate "substances" or "entities," as they had been described till then, but are merely different forms of vibrations of the molecules of which all physical bodies are made up. All these different forms of vibrations (formerly called forces) can be transformed into one another ; and all of them are but different modes of mechanical movement. A mechanical mass-movement, such as the fall of a hammer on the anvil, or the rotation of the wheels of a train when a brake is applied, can produce all these modes of movement: sound, heat, light, electricity, and magnetism. And vice versd, all these kinds of molecular movement—sound, heat, light, electricity, magnetism, and chemical action—can be transformed into one another (heat—into light, or electricity, etc.), or into mass-movements of physical bodies, as we see in our steam engines and electrical railways. Grove also had the courage to ask the question whether universal gravitation is not a mere resultant of all these molecular vibrations going on all over the universe. Haeckel, Ernst (born 1834), German biologist and philosopher. He was one of the first and one of the most enthusiastic followers of Darwin, and soon after the appearance of "Origin of Species" he published (in 1866) a most remarkable work, "General Morphology," followed by the "Natural History of Creation," in which he made the first attempt to find out the different stages of evolution from the simplest organisms up to man. In his later years he wrote two works, widely circulated now, "Monism as a Link between Religion and Science" and "The Riddle of the Universe," in which he cast aside the religious dualism which opposes the heavens to the earth, the soul to the body, and so on ; but instead of coming to a purely dynamic conception of the universe, as might have been expected from his previous works, he came to the metaphysical (Hegelian) conception of the "Spirit" being an emanation of "Matter." Hegel, Georg Wilhelm (1770-1831), a German philosopher, whose ideas exercised in Germany a very deep influence on the thought of the nineteenth century during the period of reaction after the defeat of the Great French Revolution. His philosophical system divides itself into three cycles of thought. The first is Logic—the science of the " Idea in itself" (Idee an sichj. In the second part, the Philosophy of Nature, the Idea is treated in its "being," as something that has taken the form of its contradiction—i.e., of Nature and its beings and phenomena. And in the third part, the Philosophy of the Mind, the process is described by