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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02
Page 4
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02 - Page 4. February 2, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/989.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (February 2, 1939). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/989

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02 - Page 4, February 2, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/989.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. I, No. 2, 1939-02-02
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Norfolk, Virginia
Date February 2, 1939
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0648_L.pdf
Transcript Page 4 First American Fleet ( Continued from Page 1.) unsatisfactory as the navy of one colony would remain peacefully at home while British ships were attack­ing the coast of its neighbor. In 1775 Congress authorized the construction of an American Fleet and on December 22, 1775, Esek Hop­kins was appointed Commander- in­Chief of the Navy with a salary of $ 125.00 per month. With the exception of the President of the United States, he was the only man in history to hold this title. Eight of these ships were completed by January, 1776. With green crews and a fleet whose total armament was only one hundred and ten guns, Hopkins was ordered to attack the British forces in Chesapeake Bay, off the Carolinas, and off Rhode Island. Failing to find the British forces off the mouth of the Chesapeake, Hopkins proceeded to capture some munitions of war at Nassau, Bahamas. These munitions would have been gladly welcomed bY' the Colonies who were always short of powder; but, unfor­tunately, on the return to Rhode Is­land, Hopkins' fleet was attacked by the British ship Glasow, of twenty guns, which inflicted appreciable dam­age and escaped. · During the Revolutionary War other ships were added to the Navy, but as England had eighty- five men- of­war in American waters, this Colon­ial Navy accomplished little until the arrival of the French Fleet, when the two flee. ts combined obtained command of the sea, and forced the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. When peace was signed, the navy ships were sold or given away and by 1785 there was no navy. In 1796 Washngton urged the main­tenance of a Naval Force, saying, " To secure respect to a neutral flag requires a Naval Force, organized and ready to vindicate it from in­sults and aggression. This may even prevent the necessity of going to war by discouraging belligerant powers from committing such violations of the rights of the neutral party, as may, first or last, leave no other op­tion". THE BLUE ' BONNET How To Play Bridge Pick up your cards as dealt. You will be ready to bid ahead of the others. If your hand is rotten, mention it. It will guide your partner in his bid and play. If your partner bids first, don't hesitate to raise- he has to play it. Never hurry. Try several cards on a trick until you are sure which one you prefer. Occasionally ask what are trumps. It will show you are interested. Don't show lack of interest while you are dummy. Help your partner out with suggestions. Talk about other subjects during the game. It makes for good- fellow­ship. Feel free to criticize your partner. He will do much better as a result. Always trump your partner's best tricks. Never take a chance. If it is a money game, always quit when you are ahead. The folks will remember you. Always explain your plays, particu­larly when set. It shows your card knowledge. Disagree with established rules and conventions. You will be known for a person of independent mind. Eat chocolate creams or other adhe­sive candy to keep cards from skid­ding. ....... Answers ( Continued from Page 3.) The molded ... breadth of a ship is the breadth of the ship at its widest point measured to the outside sur­face of the frames. Camber is the curvature given to the weather decks to help drainage and give more added strength. Sheer is the excess of freeboard forward or aft over that amidships. Deadweight tonnage is the number of tons of stores, fuel, and cargo a ship can carry without exceeding her designed draft: Gross tonnage is the volume of a ship below the main deck in cubic feet divided by a hun­dred: Net tonnage is the volume of the cargo space in cubic feet divided by a hundred. t u. s. s. Houston- 2- 2- 39- 900. For a 10,000 ton ship five or more years from date of commission it is es­tamated that there is 2 to 4 hundred tons of paint on her. * * * * The first U. S. warship of iron, using steam was the l\ UCHIGA , built at Erie, Pa., in 1844. On June 17, 1905 the ship was reconditioned as a steam vessel. She was finally stricken from the Navy List on March 12, 1927 after 85 years of service. * * • * The first Navy Yard acquired, after the establishment of the Navy De­partment, was the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. on April 30, 1798. The Government purchased 58 acres at that time, for which it paid $ 5,500. • • • • A nautical mile or " Knot" is 6080 feet. Three nautical or marine miles equal one marine league. * * * * The first U. S. warship to circum­navigate the globe was the U. S. S. Vin­cennes, commanded by Captain Wil­liam Finch. She left New York Sep­tember 3, 1826 and returned via the Cape of Good Hope on June 8, 1830. * * * * The anchors of the battleship U. S. S. WEST VIRGI IA ( of which she car­ries three) each weight ten tons. * • • * The Navy today is operating 478 engineering plants in vessels. These range from the 180,000 horse- power turbo- electric drive plants in the large a: rcraft carrel'S to a 240 horsepower diesel plant in some of the smaller district craft. • * • • aval tugs are classified as ocean­going tugs and harbor tug . Ocean­going tugs are named after Indian Tribes, and harbor tugs are assigned names of Indian Chiefs and words of Indian language.